Orange is the New Black: Sent to SHU

Two of our favorite characters on Orange is the New Black spend time in the segregated housing unit (SHU) in season 3.

Season 3 spoilers ahead.

According to a recent report on solitary confinement, the practice of solitary confinement is overused and ineffective.

. . . evidence mounts that solitary confinement produces many unwanted and harmful outcomes—for the mental and physical health of those placed in isolation, for the public safety of the communities to which most will return, and for the corrections budgets of jurisdictions that rely on the practice for facility safety.


Natasha Lyonne as NIcky in Orange is the New Black

Remember the bags of Vee’s heroin that Nicky hid in the vent in the laundry? Yeah. That heroin. Well, Nicky and Big Boo (Lea DeLaria) decide to get it out of the prison. Luschek (Matt Peters) will help them and will sell it in the outside world. They plan to use the tunnel that opens into the greenhouse.

That plan falls through. Nicky gets nervous and moves the bags into a fluorescent light housing in the laundry. It falls out. The girls in the laundry get stoned on it. Luschek gets all the remaining heroin from them, puts it in a toolbox with Nicky watching, and carries it out of the prison.

Nicky saves one tiny bag and sticks it under Luschek’s desk. She can’t bear to let it all go. The laundry girls talk, so Caputo (Nick Sandow) searches electrical. Of course, they find the little bag.

Nicky gets all the blame and is sent to SHU Maximum Security [see comments]. Luschek points the finger at her, and that’s all the proof anyone needs. There is no investigation. Nicky’s just carted off. Luschek is not blamed for anything.

This happens in episode 3. Nicky is gone for the rest of the season. Orange is the New Black just isn’t right without Nicky, you know?

I wish there had been an episode near the end of season 3 where Nicky returned. It would have been good to see the effect on her. Maybe that will happen in season 4.


Laverne Cox as Sophia in Orange is the New Black

Motherhood is one of the main themes throughout all of season 3. Sophia’s story as a parent is particularly difficult and touching. Her son (Michael Rainey, Jr.) is doing the teen rebellion thing and she doesn’t know how to help with it. She doesn’t know if he needs mothering or fathering from her. She’s conflicted and upset. Her wife (Tanya Wright) says Michael is out of control.

She tries to help by having him come to the prison more often. Gloria (Selenis Leyva) is trying to see her teen-aged son more often, too. She arranges for him to ride with Sophia’s wife for the visits.

The boys get in trouble. Sophia blames Gloria’s boy. Gloria blames Sophia’s boy. Sophia’s wife stops bringing Gloria’s son to visit.

Tension between Sophia and the entire kitchen staff results in Sophia being targeted with transphobic bullying. It sweeps through the prison like a wave. She’s attacked and beaten up by other black women. They even take her blonde wig right off her head. Dirty fighting, that.

The fight wasn’t Sophia’s fault, but she gets taken to SHU “for her own protection.” Nothing happens to any of the instigators or attackers, although, to Gloria’s credit, she looks really sorry about what happened.

Misuse of Solitary

At least in Sophia’s case, Caputo argues against sending her to SHU. But the for-profit bosses running the prison overrule him. I have heard that putting transgender prisoners in solitary “for their own protection” is a common practice in prisons.

In both cases, SHU was used as a quick answer rather than a solution. In both cases, the person who will suffer the horrors of isolation for who-knows-how-long should have been handled in some other way.

There are documented cases where people are kept in isolation for YEARS. As many as 80,000 individuals may be held in isolation per day in federal facilities alone. “Long-term isolation can create or exacerbate serious mental health problems and assaultive or anti-social behavior, result in negative outcomes for institutional safety, and increase the risk of recidivism after release.”

Nicky and Sophia have decent mental health. What if Suzanne (Uzo Aduba) or Morello (Yael Stone) or the paranoid new prisoner Lolly (Lori Petty) ended up in SHU? What about the depressed Soso (Kimiko Glenn)? They would be basket cases when they came out. Or dead.

Piper (Taylor Schilling) did a couple of short stints in SHU in previous seasons, but she had more people working to get her out. What happens when no one is trying to get someone out?

I know Orange is the New Black is TV, not real prison. But I think it brings the injustice and inhumanity of the real prison system into focus for the general public with story lines like these for Nicky and Sophia.

It’s easy to understand why the real Piper Kerman came out of prison and wrote a book. And why she became an activist for prison reform. And why she continues to provide input into this series.

Orange is the New Black: Pennsatucky and Big Boo

Toward the end of season 2 of Orange is the New Black, we saw the beginnings of a friendship between Big Boo (Lea DeLaria) and Doggett, AKA Pennsatucky, (Taryn Manning). In season 3 it becomes an important relationship for both characters.

Spoilers ahead.

Taryn Manning and Lea DeLaria in the "Mother's Day" episode of Orange is the New Black
Taryn Manning and Lea DeLaria in the “Mother’s Day” episode of Orange is the New Black

It starts immediately in episode 1 of season 3. Pennsatucky mourns all her pregnancies on Mother’s Day as the rest of the prison’s women celebrate with their visiting children. Big Boo comes to sit beside her.

Doggett says she feels terrible about all her abortions. Big Boo launches into a discussion of the book Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. In this book there is a discussion about how the passage of Roe vs. Wade, which legalized abortion, lead to a reduction in the crime rate 20 years later. The hidden side of that story – and Big Boo’s point – is that unwanted and neglected children often end up committing crimes and being incarcerated.

This discussion was handled very tactfully and gave some comfort to Doggett, who knew she was a meth head and would have been a terrible mother.

So many back stories in Orange is the New Black are about women who weren’t loved and wanted as children. We see several such flashbacks in season 3.

The “Mother’s Day” episode started Season 3 on a series of character studies about how women in prison deal with motherhood. It shows the social costs of the war on drugs and the devastating effects on families when mothers are locked up because of minor drug charges. This practice only perpetuates a cycle of neglect and is one of the greatest failures of the idea of mandatory sentencing for drug crimes.

According to this article,

. . . six in 10 women in real federal prison are there for nonviolent drug crimes. For every woman who has committed murder there are 99 drug offenders. Almost none of the 99 are international drug smugglers like Alex Vause; most of the women incarcerated for crack cocaine or methamphetamine were caught with less than 100 grams, the weight of an average bar of soap.

Big Boo, Doggett, and Sofia in Sofia's work room
Lea DeLaria as Big Boo, Taryn Manning as Doggett, and Laverne Cox as Sofia in Sofia’s work room

Big Boo and Doggett become each other’s besties. Doggett, in particular, leans on Boo’s strength and wisdom.

Two factors lead to the next part of the story.

  1. Morello lost her job as van driver after Miss Rosa ran off with the van. Doggett is the new van driver.
  2. The prison is purchased by a for-profit company. They reduce the hours of the experienced correctional officers so they can take away their benefits. They hire new and untrained COs to fill the hours.

An inexperienced CO named Coates (James McMenamin) gets the job of guarding Doggett on van drives. He’s a complete moron. Pennsatucky has to tell him how to do his job. He gets her donuts from the other place where he works. They feed day old donuts to ducks and goof off when they should be returning to camp.

We see in a flashback that Doggett really has no idea what love is or how it’s expressed. Nor does she know how loving sexual contact works. She traded sex for goods – including six packs of Mountain Dew – as a teen. She’s confused because Coates gives her treats and tells her he likes her.

Tucky's not home
Tucky’s not home during the rape.

Coates rapes her. Doggett isn’t really sure what happened. She knows she didn’t like it, but Coates brings her a cheap bracelet and she thinks he’s just showing her his love.

When Big Boo figures out what has happened, she delivers some great dialog about consent and force that makes Doggett understand that she was raped. It’s a brilliant scene. Boo brings in a pile of goodies from the commissary, dumps them on Tucky’s bed. When Pennsatucky asks what they are for, Boo says, “I want you to eat me out.” Pennsatucky says, “No, that’s gross.” And Boo defines consent in a completely compelling way that finally makes Tucky get it.

They agree it’s pointless to report Coates. It will be a he said, she said story and they know how those turn out. They decide to drug Coates and take revenge on him by sticking a broom up his ass. When they’ve got him passed out over a table in the laundry with his bare butt exposed, Doggett can’t do it. It may be her first moral decision ever.

Doggett finds a way to escape her duties as van driver, only to see Maritza (Diane Guerrero) given the job. Doggett and Big Boo look at each other in dismay when they see Maritza report to Coates. It will be season 4 before we see what happens with Maritza.

That these two unlikely souls connect is one of the most beautiful aspects of season 3. Doggett is less of a crazy religious zealot after her past experiences, and she’s less homophobic because she sees Big Boo as a person now. Boo is good for Doggett. Their friendship allows for conversations that mean much in terms of what season 3 is about. Lea DeLaria, in particular, gets to deliver some of the best lines of the season during her interactions with Pennsatucky.

Big Boo’s back story is explored in detail in season 3, which gives Lea DeLaria situations where she defends who she is to her parents and to a homophobic world with even more excellent dialog.

Both Taryn Manning and Lea DeLaria deserve recognition for their outstanding performances this season.

Orange is the New Black Season 3

I just finished all the episodes of season 3 of Orange is the New Black. I’ll be writing about it in more depth, but I wanted to share some quick thoughts.


Season 3 could be subtitled “I need to be loved.” The sentiment was a theme in many of the episodes and back stories that played out this season. In one episode, Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” (Uzo Aduba) even says those exact words. Loneliness and a need for connection drove so many story lines.

Another theme of season 3 was parenting. Daya (Dascha Polanco) had her baby in season 3, of course, but so many episodes dealt with the difficulties of parenting while incarcerated. Over half of the women in prison have children under the age of 18. The emphasis on how parents and children are torn apart when mothers are in prison gave a very sad feeling to season 3.

The prison is bought by a for-profit corporation in season 3. The private ownership of prisons as sources of profit is an obscene practice and a great shame in the American “justice” system.

Mental health care – or more correctly the lack of mental health care – in the prison system is another theme this season.

Finally, there’s a thread about faith, spirituality and religion running through season 3. Santaria, anyone? Mazel tov!


Laura Prepon was back as Alex, while other favorites disappeared into SHU or plain disappeared. I missed those people.

There were interesting guest stars. Mary Steenbergen was in several episodes as the mother of Pornstache. Blair Brown was in a few episodes as a celebrity in trouble who surrenders herself to Litchfield in the last episode.

New prisoners included Ruby Rose, Lori Petty and Emily Althaus. All of them had a effect on the prison and the inmates in fascinating ways. Speaking of fascinating, some of the new back stories this season were surprising.

Okay. More later about all these topics. If you have overall comments about season 3, please share.

Orange is the New Black and American Culture

I’m in the midst of watching season 3 of Orange is the New Black. I’ll probably have something to say about it when I finish the entire season.

The pre-release publicity about it was everywhere last week. It made an impression on me when I realized how diverse the cast interviews were and how many actors have become known because of Orange is the New Black.

Here’s a short essay I wrote on Twitter.

Re: the power of media.

Review: Sense8

Sense8 is a Netflix original created, written and directed by J. Michael Straczynski, Andy Wachowski and Lana Wachowski, among others. It’s strange and disjointed and hard to grasp, but it’s also fascinating and intriguing and compelling. The series is an ambitious attempt at epic storytelling.

Spoilers ahead. Continue reading “Review: Sense8”

Watch This: Orange is the New Black, season 3 preview

June 12 is almost here, and the Orange is the New Black media machine is gearing up accordingly. Here’s a new preview for season 3.

Last week I was in Texas for my granddaughter’s high school graduation. Afterwards, my family and another family with my granddaughter’s BFF all went out to dinner.

We two families have known each other since the girls were in day care. We’ve been friends ever since. We don’t share the same taste in cars, movies, or anything else. Except for Orange is the New Black. In mid-meal, the other girl’s dad, who is a deputy sheriff, said, “I can hardly wait for season 3 of Orange is the New Black!” Both the 18 year old girls chimed in and said, “Yeah, I love that show.” My own daughter, who doesn’t like any of the same shows I like, even said she liked OITNB.

Really, the earth stopped that day in a Texas Mexican food joint as I took in the momentous occasion of actually knowing real human beings who love a show I love. (Not that people who read this blog aren’t real. But I don’t actually know any of you.)

OMG, people! OITNB is almost here!

Actors on Actors -UPDATED

Variety has created a series of conversations called “Actors on Actors” that are fascinating discussions between peers. Most of them are a man and a woman. I picked these three to include here because both the conversationalists are women, but don’t overlook the others at Variety Studio: Actors on Actors.

The women’s conversations are about art and craft and fame and the meaning of success.



UPDATE: Here’s another that just published with two women in conversation.

Watch This: Trailer for Advantageous

Advantageous, which took the SXSW Special Jury Prize for Collaborative Vision, will be streaming on Netflix starting June 23. The film is from writer and director Jennifer Phang.

Still from the film Advantageous

I first became interested in this sci-fi drama when I read Emily Yoshida’s SXSW report about it in The Verge. Here’s how she described the film at the time:

[Advantageous] was the first sci-fi film I had seen at the festival, as well as the first genre film in general. It’s a quiet, deliberately paced story of a woman, her daughter, and a medical procedure with philosophical implications worthy of a Black Mirror Mother’s Day special. Gwen (Jacqueline Kim, who also co-wrote the film) is a spokeswoman for a new-fangled body-swapping procedure, who must undergo the procedure herself in order to keep her job and be able to ensure a good future for her daughter, Jules (Samantha Kim). It’s moody and specific and is a rare sci-fi film to nail its human emotion — particularly the mother-daughter relationship at its center — just as expertly, if not more so, as its more lofty philosophical questions.

According to the film’s Facebook page, Jennifer Phang received the award for Best Director, and the film won in three other categories at the LA Asian Pacific Film Festival.

The film will be released in some 20+ languages and will include a version with Jennifer Phang giving director’s commentary on some of the topics explored in the film.

I’m looking forward to the film. It looks very good.

I appreciate Netflix for making the deal to stream Advantageous and for backing the recent Grace and Frankie and other female-based content.

Addendum: Now that I’ve seen the film, you can read my review of Advantageous here.

Orange is the New Black Season 3 Promos

June 12, people. Orange is the New Black, with the best social media staff IN THE WORLD, has visuals to help you remember that date. June 12 – got it?

There are also a few still shots besides the awesome preview video.
Taryn Manning and Lea DeLaria sit on the grass. Lea is covered with colored balls
What are we doing here? Mourning the demise of the lesbian agenda? Putting a collection of pet crickets to rest? Planning a clown school?
Kate Mulgrew and Selenis Leyva  face off
Look at those faces. I love those faces, those stares, those raised eyebrows. Litchfield never lets life get comfortable.
Taylor Schilling and Ruby Rose looking very friendly
A new person in the cast and she appears to make friends quickly. Think she’ll stir up trouble the way Vee did?
A group scene with numerous cast members looking up at something
Don’t they look a lot happier since Miss Rosa did them a great service regarding Vee? Is this not the best cast anywhere on television? Yes, it is.

Review: Grace and Frankie Season 1

Grace and Frankie hit Netflix last weekend and I watched every episode. It was a bit uneven, but I loved it anyway.

Sam Waterston and Martin Sheen in Frankie and Grace

Spoilers ahead. Continue reading “Review: Grace and Frankie Season 1”