Woman in Gold: Tatiana Maslany will be Young Helen Mirren

There are no trailers or preview images for Woman in Gold yet. Based on a true story, it’s due to release in 2015. The film is described this way:

Maria Altmann, an octogenarian Jewish refugee, takes on the government to recover artwork she believes rightfully belongs to her family.

The film features Helen Mirren, Tatiana Maslany, and Ryan Reynolds. Tatiana Maslany is playing the younger Maria Altmann, Helen Mirren is playing the older one. In addition to the fact that both of these actresses are impressively talented, there’s also the fact that they look believably similar.

Helen Mirren and Tatiana Maslany
Helen Mirren and Tatiana Maslany

Tatiana Maslany famously has received no Emmy nomination for her stunning performance(s) in Orphan Black, but the people doing the casting for Woman in Gold obviously weren’t worried about casting her as a younger version of the powerhouse Helen Mirren. Dame Mirren has won an Academy Award for Best Actress, four BAFTAs, three Golden Globes, four Emmy Awards, and two Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Awards.

Maslany’s racked up a few awards already, but none so impressive as Dame Mirren’s. Maslany won an ACTRA and a Phillip Borsos Award. For Orphan Black she’s won two Critics’ Choice Television Awards, a Television Critics Award, and a Canadian Screen Award. So far. That freakin’ Emmy better be coming at some point.

Woman in Gold is directed by Simon Curtis and written by Alexi Kaye Campbell. The film also stars Daniel Brühl, Katie Holmes, Charles Dance and Max Irons.

Aquadettes: A Short Documentary

Aquadettes – On Life, Death and Synchronized Swimming is a short documentary about a group of elders on a synchronized swimming team in California. One particular swimmer, 76-year-old Margo Bauer, is featured. Margo has MS and is helped with her condition both by the swimming and by medical marijuana.

The women on this swim team are my kind of women. Recently I’ve joined a YMCA and have been following my doctors orders to get up off my lazy ass (she didn’t word it quite like that) and get more exercise. So the aquatics exercise program at the Y is now part of my weekly schedule and I’m loving it. Plus, I’m feeling stronger, better and less plagued with aches and pains.

This is the complete film. I hope you enjoy it.

The film is by Drea Cooper & Zackary Canepari and is part of the California is a Place series of  documentaries about California. You can read more about Drea Cooper and Zackary Canepari and their documentary series in this article at “Filmmaker.”

Recap: Last Tango in Halifax, S2, E6

The final episode of season 2 of Last Tango in Halifax lurches to a grim beginning and works its way through a lot of laughs to a mostly happy season conclusion.

On the farm, the morning after her confession to Caroline (Sarah Lancashire), Gillian (Nicola Walker) prods Caroline awake.

Are you going to tell?
Are you going to tell?

Caroline struggles to sit up. Gillian asks immediately, before Caroline is even upright, if she is going to turn her in to the police.

Beautiful when hungover
Beautiful when hungover

They are both wrecked, hungover, puffy. They look beautiful: real and honest. They conduct a raw, open discussion of the humiliations Eddie did to Gillian. Gillian says, “If I hadn’t done it to him, Caroline, he would have done it to me.”

Breakfast at Muriel's
Breakfast at Muriel’s

Celia (Anne Reid) and Alan (Derek Jacobi) spent the night at Muriel’s (Gemma Jones). They’re having breakfast when Murial suggests she’d like to do some sort of hen party for Celia the night before the wedding.

Celia and Alan tease Muriel about wanting a wild night – in Amsterdam – with strippers and lap dancers and pole dancing. Muriel says she doesn’t mind going to Amsterdam for the art galleries. Alan and Celia have a hilarious conversation at Muriel’s expense.

Why did you tell me?
Why did you tell me?

Caroline and Gillian move to the table – nursing their hangovers with tea – still processing Gillian’s confession. Caroline thinks Gillian told her because she needed to tell someone.

I don't know why
I don’t know why

Caroline asks if Gillian wants her to turn her in. “No. No.” Gillian says, “Now I’ve buggered everything up.”

Caroline says, “I’m not going to turn you in.”

Celia and Alan drive away from Muriel’s. In spite of their teasing, they like the idea of a stag night for Alan and a hen night for Celia. Celia even plans to invite Muriel.

Caroline and Gillian drive to the hotel where they left the Land Rover and Caroline’s phone the night before.

Here's Lawrence
Here’s Lawrence back again.

Kate (Nina Sosayna) arrives at Caroline’s house with Lawrence (Louis Greatorex) in tow. He called Kate the night before when John (Tony Gardner) disappeared on him. Kate says he left messages for his mother about where he was but refused to call John.

John offers lame excuses for why he went out, leaving Lawrence alone. The home phone rings.

You bloody idiot
You bloody idiot

Caroline shouts, “Where’s Lawrence!” John says he’s fine, minimizes the whole event and shuts the door in Kate’s face. Kate stares at the door, says, “No problem. Anytime.”

Caroline calls John an idiot. He tells her that Lawrence slept at Kate’s, an idea suggested by William.

Caroline hangs up. Before she leaves the hotel, she turns to Gillian. “I think you’re right about you and Robbie.”

“Yeah, I really like him,” Gillian answers.

“No. You said it could never be a good idea – you and him. Move on. You’re a nice person, you’re a good mother, you work hard. Something appalling happened. Move on. If I’m keeping a secret for you, you need to stay away from him. Surely you can see that.”

When Caroline reaches her home in Harrogate, John is still hanging about fixing soup for Lawrence. John tells her that Judith (Ronni Ancona) won’t get rid of the baby. Caroline says, “You’ll be divorced. You could marry her.” John says that won’t be happening.

May I come inside?
May I come inside?

Caroline gets cleaned up and takes flowers to Kate, to say thank you about Lawrence. Caroline asks Kate if she can come in.

She asks if Kate has a birthing partner (yes, her mum) and if Kate has anyone (no).

Would you give me another chance?
Would you give me another chance?

Caroline wanders nervously through a story approximating what she did the previous night and why she didn’t respond to Lawrence until she gets to her real point. Caroline and Kate had something really nice between them, Caroline says, and asks one more time for Kate to take her back. She promises to do better.

Still no.
Still no.

“No. Thank you.” Kate answers gently. From my seat, I don’t see how she can resist the painful pleading in Caroline’s eyes, but she is firm in her refusal. Kate’s breaking Caroline’s heart and mine, too.

Alan and Harry (Paul Copley) explain an elaborate plan for Alan’s stag night involving an overnight trip on Harry’s boat which will bring them to the hotel by 10 AM. Harry’s boat needs a lot of work before then.

you're not going to spend a night in that crate.
You’re not going to spend a night in that crate.

Celia tells them that her party with Caroline, Gillian and Muriel will be paintballing. She’s not serious, but Harry wants to go to her party.

Later, Caroline and her mom are in the kitchen at Harrogate. Celia suggests maybe John could walk her down the aisle – give her away. Caroline gives all the reasons why that can’t be. She mentions all the tricks Celia has played on John over the years.

That was comical.
That was comical.

Celia has a good laugh remembering the time John snapped all the tendons in his ankle, the time she let all the air out of his tires, and some other wonderful memories which eventually prove to her that John wouldn’t be the best choice for walking her down the aisle.

You can't mention that one.
You can’t mention that one.

Harry and Alan are in Halifax, figuring out their speeches for the wedding and what stories Harry is permitted to tell about Alan.

Gillian enters and says she wants to go to the cemetery tomorrow for her mum’s birthday.

It was my fault the bungalow fell through
It was my fault the bungalow fell through

Next day Alan and Gillian sit on a bench at the cemetery with little Calamity in a carrier. Alan admits that when his renters didn’t have enough money to buy his house, he didn’t have the heart to toss them out to put the house on the market. That’s why the deal on the bungalow fell through. Gillian thinks he’s always been too kind for his own good.

Gillian goes off to the grave of an uncle who was killed in the war. Alan has a graveside chat with his dead wife and says he hopes she approves of him getting wed again. Why didn’t he do this months ago, if it needed doing?

It's a sign
It’s a sign

Like a blessing, a gust of wind blows flowers from a tree where Alan is standing. They rain around him like snow. He catches one blossom in his hand and takes it as a sign.

She's ready
She’s ready

A montage covering several months shows us Harry and Alan working on the boat with Celia’s assistance, shows us Caroline alone and lonely, shows us Gillian alone and lonely, and finally a boat that is ready for use.

Near Christmas, Caroline learns that Kate’s gone to the hospital with some bleeding. Caroline rushes off to be with her. She finds Kate sitting alone in the waiting room. Caroline sits down beside her. They don’t touch.

It might be nothing.
It might be nothing.

Caroline assures Kate that she’s fine. She’s 20+ weeks now. However, four miscarriages would make anybody jumpy and Kate is scared. When they call Kate back she allows Caroline to go with her.

Kate clutches Caroline’s hand as they begin the ultrasound. As Caroline looks at the ultrasound readout with Kate’s hand in hers, we see a light in Caroline’s eyes for the first time in months. Kate’s fine. The baby is fine. Kate asks about sex and learns the baby is female. As Kate relaxes from her fears, she realizes she’s holding Caroline’s hand and drops it, saying, “Sorry.” Out goes the light in Caroline’s eyes.

Caroline, Lawrence, Alan and Celia have dinner in Harrogate. Alan explains that his brother Ted can’t make the wedding because he broke a leg.

Celia wants Caroline to call Kate about the wedding because she offered to play “The Arrival of the Queen of Sheba” for it. Caroline tells Celia to call Kate herself.

William arrives home from Oxford, with his laundry, and sits down at the table. William’s looking very grown up with a new hair cut. He has a girlfriend he wants to bring to the wedding.

Does she know you're a puff?
Does she know you’re a puff?

Lawrence says, “Does she know you’re a puff?” and William says “I’ve been meaning to break this to you, and I know you’ll be disappointed, but I’m not gay.”

Alan, Lawrence and William whisper some secret plan when the woman are clearing the table. Ted (Timothy West) calls and Alan talks to him about the weather as Gillian sneaks him in Caroline’s door.

I didn't really break my leg
I didn’t really break my leg

Alan jumps up in surprise, hugs his brother. They laugh about how surprised and happy they are that he made it. Ted hugs Celia and grabs her ass. “Always a handful!”

The stag party
The stag party

Alan, Ted, Harry, Raff (Josh Bolt) and Robbie (Dean Andrews) share drinks at Alan’s stag party. As they laugh at silly jokes, Alan suggests to Robbie that he and Gillian should get back together. Raff agrees.

The hen party
The hen party

The hen party is more elegant but just as funny. It includes Celia, Muriel, Caroline and Gillian.

I’ve been waiting for a serious scene between the formidable duo of Anne Reid and Gemma Jones. We finally get it when Caroline and Gillian go off to the restroom together.

Celia tells her sister how miserable her marriage was. Muriel knows that Celia has never forgiven her for Frank but she’s truly glad that Celia is happy now. It might be the first honest conversation Celia’s had with Muriel in years.

The wedding scenes begin with a shot of Kate’s fingers on a piano keyboard. Celia looks lovely but I don’t like what Caroline and Gillian are wearing. (Nicola Walker didn’t like the dress either.) Caroline walks her mom down the aisle.

Getting wed
Getting wed

As Alan and Celia recite their vows (which Anne Reid does with extraordinary meaning, I must say) we see everyone’s reactions to the words. Gillian looks troubled, Caroline is stealing glances at Kate, Kate is stealing glances at Caroline, Robbie’s date looks hopeful while Robbie steals glances at Gillian. Kate plays them out with a ragtime tune and the party begins.

At the party, Caroline gives a beautiful speech that reflects my thoughts about Celia and Alan’s story exactly. Harry gives a charming speech. When it’s Alan’s turn to speak, he takes the microphone and leaves the table. No one knows what he’s doing.

You have a beautiful body
You have a beautiful body

Alan performs a song and dance, complete with backup dancers and singers attired in kilts. The lyrics are “If I said you had a beautiful body, would you hold it against me?” The song is perfect – funny and embarrassing – and the party is off to a great start.

Time to dance! Alan and Celia dance every dance. They do dance beautifully together, don’t they?

Kate comes up to Caroline and says she’s going. Kate says, “Have a nice Christmas.”

“How likely is that?” Caroline asks, then immediately regrets it. “Sorry. You . . . you have a nice Christmas, too.” Kate leaves the party.

Wallflowers
Wallflowers

Caroline and Gillian sit at a table, partnerless. It’s a beautiful party, but it’s passing them by. Gillian decides to cut in on Robbie for a dance. “Not Robbie,” says Caroline, but Gillian does it. A brief conversation and Robbie pulls her close.

You are a challenge
You are a challenge

Roberta Flack’s romantic version of “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow” plays and everyone snuggles in a slow dance.

Kate returns. She marches across the dance floor to stand in front of a surprised Caroline. “I got in, shut the door and turned round and came straight back. Do you want to dance?”

Do you want to dance
Do you want to dance?

Their situations reversed, Caroline is the insecure one now. She wants to know if this is “forever” and Kate quips, “forever’s a mighty long time.”

finally
Caroline’s coming out kiss.

The moment they’re close and touching, they kiss. A long, lingering, very public kiss. Lawrence covers his eyes, Gillian smiles, William beams, Muriel isn’t appalled, Alan is happy, and Celia groans. Caroline and Kate are oblivious to anything but each other.

There’s a beautiful exterior shot of the hotel, laced with snow early the next morning – Christmas day – and a room tour of the still snoozing guests.

The renewly wed
The renewly wed

Alan and Celia hold hands as they spoon.

A single room
Just one room

Caroline and Kate finally shared a room at the hotel.

Cut for a beat to John and Judith, who are passed out on Judith’s couch with empty bottles littering the table in front of them.

What have I done?
What have I done?

Gillian wakes up in the hotel with Robbie and wonders what fresh hell she’s gotten herself into now.

Season 2 closes with smiles, some story lines tied up with gaily colored ribbons, and a few tempting issues to make us eager for season 3.

Bravo. Bravo to the cast and crew. Bravo to Sally Wainwright for her wonderful storytelling. Bravo!

How We Watch TV (Infographic)

This infographic suggests that we have a lot of channels but we watch very few. Take a look and then let’s talk about the channels you watch and how you fit into the statistics on the infographic.

How America Is Watching TV, an Infographic by Koeppel Direct

I pay for 120 channels. Here are the channels I watch.

  1. ABC Family
  2. FX
  3. Lifetime
  4. Syfy
  5. TNT
  6. TV Land
  7. USA
  8. ABC
  9. NBC
  10. CBS
  11. FOX
  12. PBS

Wow, only 12. If I had them in my package, I’d watch WGN (for the new show Manhattan) and BBC America (for Orphan Black) and Bravo (for Inside The Actor’s Studio). Of course, if I had them, I’d watch some things on HBO and Showtime.

It’s cheaper for me to buy Orphan Black on iTunes than it is to get a package that includes BBC America. The others, I’ll do without. I also have Netflix.

It would be wonderful if you could get only the channels you want. Wouldn’t that be the greatest?

How many channels do you actually watch out of what you pay for?

How much of your TV time is spent watching is live TV – commercials and all – vs. watching later and skipping the commercials? I’d say I watch about 30% of what I watch off my DVR, and I fast forward through the commercials.

I have one TV. How about you?

Do you watch things on your computer or tablet? I do. Frequently. I find I can see it better when it’s close up and on a high resolution screen. The old eyes ain’t what they used to be.

How do your habits match up with the statistics in the infographic?

TV with remote image via Flickr

Watch This: Trailer for A Second Chance

The Danish film A Second Chance (En Chance Til) will premier at the 2014 Toronto Film Festival. It’s a film from Academy Award winning director Suzanne Bier.

Based on the trailer, the film looks powerful and gut-wrenching. The film stars Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Ulrich Thomsen, Nikolaj Lie Kaas, and Maria Bonnevie.

A police officer steals a child from drug-addicted parents at a crime scene. His wife bonds with the child and threatens to kill herself if he returns the child to the real parents. It looks complicated and fraught and full of many of the deep, meaningful emotions that make me a fan of many Danish films.

It will be a while before this film reaches any likely places to view it in the U.S. – probably on a streaming service like Netflix or Amazon. It looks excellent. I hope it becomes available to Americans soon.

A Second Chance Photo by Henrik Petit

Watch This: Our Leader the Mockingjay

A new trailer for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 released. Looks like Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss is getting herself an ragtag army and a rebellion whether she wants one or not. The suggested hashtag from the trailer is #OurLeaderTheMockingjay.

I caught a glimpse of Julianne Moore in this trailer. She’s a nice addition to The Hunger Games franchise. She’s a nice addition to anything.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 is scheduled for release in November. What a good way to spend the Thanksgiving weekend. I’m ready to drop my dollars going to see this female-led drama. What about you?

Watch This: Trailer for Fort Bliss

Men go off to war and women support them and their country by staying at home, taking care of the kids, taking care of the house, and being there with love when the soldier returns. That’s what women do.

But when the soldier is a woman, a man may not do the same for family and country. A man may resent being the one who has to take care of things at home, raise the kids, do what women have done since forever. And a 5 year old son may grow away from his mother completely in 15 months of absence, especially if the parent remaining at home isn’t encouraging him to stay connected to his absent parent.

Fort Bliss is about a female army medic who serves 15 months in Afghanistan. The medic is played by Michelle Monaghan. Also starring in the film are Ron Livingston, Pablo Schreiber, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Gbenga Akinnagbe, Dash Mihok and Oakes Fegley as the medic’s son.

As the medic struggles to reconnect with her son, she’s faced with the possibility of redeployment. Take a look at the trailer.

The film was written, directed and produced by Claudia Myers. It opens in September in theaters and will be available on demand at the same time.

Images © 2014 – Voltage Pictures

Recap: Last Tango in Halifax S2, E5

Episode 5 of Last Tango in Halifax begins in Harrogate where the Elliots are packing a car with William’s (Edward Ashley) things as he sets off for Oxford.

house for sale
House for sale

A for sale sign is outside the driveway. John (Tony Gardner) and Caroline (Sarah Lancashire) take a moment to share a rancorous discussion about their divorce papers as John carries out William’s luggage.

Saying goodbye
Saying goodbye

Everyone comes outside to see William off, including Celia (Anne Reid) and Alan (Derek Jacobi) who are making tea in the cottage. Hugs and handshakes and Lawrence’s (Louis Greatorex), “Finally we get rid of him,” and William is off with John driving.

A hug from mom
A hug from mom

Caroline looks torn as her eldest drives away from the nest to begin college. Celia follows her down the driveway as the car disappears and wraps her in a hug. “Big day,” Celia says.

They talk about mundane things for a moment. Celia says she and Alan are going to Ripponden to help with the baby. She says, “It’s a shame that bungalow fell through.”

Caroline asks about Celia’s wedding plans. Celia says they are on hold because of Alan’s brother Ted in New Zealand. They can’t plan a date around all of them who want to come from there.

Celia wants to know if there have been any inquiries about the house. Caroline says not this week.

She's so alone

Caroline walks into the kitchen and stands there, utterly alone. Beautiful image, even though it’s full of pain. This kitchen, with its big window, has been a wonderful frame for some lovely shots, but this one is exceptional.

At the farm Ellie (Katherine Rose Morley) hands off the baby, dirty nappy and all, to Raff (Josh Bolt). He passes the baby to Gillian (Nicola Walker) for burping and a diaper change.

dirty nappy
Is that a dirty nappy?

Everyone calls the baby Calamity. Gillian says, “Calamity, is there no end to your shining wealth of talents,” in regard to her dirty nappy. In spite of everything that’s wrong in Gillian’s life, and there’s plenty wrong, little Emily Jane makes her happy. Perhaps she sees a bit of redemption in her grandchild’s eyes.

Ellie has moved in at the farm, with cash coming from her mother to help out. Raff says he, Ellie and Calamity are eating at Robbie’s that night. Cheryl is cooking. (Cheryl? Who is Cheryl?)

The two young people leave for school and Gillian is alone with the baby.

I'm pregnant
I’m pregnant

Kate (Nina Sosanya) enters Caroline’s office. She sits down across the desk from Caroline and tells her she’s pregnant. She’s past 12 weeks now and is cautiously thinking about the future. She asks for arrangements to be made for her to work part time after the baby comes. Caroline asks for time to work out the logistics.

As Kate is leaving, Caroline says, “Congratulation.” Kate smiles and says, “Thank you,” but Caroline cannot look at her.

Congratulations
Congratulations

As soon as Kate closes the door, Caroline begins to cry.

Gillian loads a trailer with sheep as Alan and Celia arrive. She tells them the baby is with Harry (Paul Copley) down at the wharf. Celia goes inside to use the bathroom. Gillian tells Alan the relatives in New Zealand keep Skyping about a date to come to the wedding. Alan says Celia won’t set a date, but his story isn’t like Celia’s on this topic. He says it’s because of Celia’s sister, Muriel.

At the wharf, Harry has a boat where he plans to live. He’s going to install a stove, a satellite dish, and a drinks cabinet.

Take it for a spin
Take it for a spin

He says losing Maurice made him want to seize the day. He wants to take them for a spin and Alan is ready to jump aboard. Celia grabs Alan’s coattails and won’t let him go. She tells Harry he’s a dozy old sod. I’m not sure what that means, but I don’t think it’s a compliment.

Alan and Celia have dinner at the farm with Gillian. Gillian tells them Robbie (Dean Andrews) has a new girlfriend named Cheryl. She’s a cop like Robbie, blonde, gorgeous and 15 years younger than him. Celia talks about John being back with Judith like a bad habit.

Tell me about your sister.
Tell me about your sister

Gillian says, “Celia, tell me about your sister. I didn’t know you had a sister. Shame the wedding plans have got bogged down because of her.”

Celia says it’s because of Ted. No, says Gillian. There’s no problem with Ted coming from New Zealand. You set a date, they turn up. Celia isn’t thrilled about her daughter-in-law calling her bluff.

Can I move in with my dad?
Can I move in with my dad?

Caroline and Lawrence are having a quiet dinner. He asks if he can move in with his dad. Caroline thinks this is a bad idea, but Lawrence says at least his dad isn’t boring. Before they can finish talking about Lawrence’s idea, Gillian calls.

Let's talk about the wedding.
The wedding is bogged down

Gillian tells Caroline that the wedding is bogged down. Caroline says, yeah because of Ted. No says Gillian, it’s because of Muriel. She wants to move it along for her dad’s sake.

It's because of Muriel
It’s because of Muriel

Caroline says she’s not surprised. Muriel and her mom are chalk and cheese. Gillian asks Caroline to ring Muriel so they can get things moving. Caroline says it will be complicated.

Gillian goes into the living room where Celia and Alan are playing Trivial Pursuit. Celia says, “Sherlock Holmes, the Beatles, Shakespeare,” before Alan even reads the question because that’s the answer to everything.

Why don't Caroline and I plan the wedding
Why don’t Caroline and I plan the wedding

Gillian suggests she and Caroline organize the wedding. They can check out venues, make up an invite list. Gillian says Celia can cross anyone out. Celia agrees just as her phone rings. It’s Muriel (Gemma Jones). Celia answers with false cheer.

She seems to be smiling
She seems to be smiling

Celia speaks with apparent warmth to Muriel, but it looks forced. Muriel is enthusiastic about Alan Buttershaw and how wonderful everything is. She asks when the wedding is. Celia says she and Alan were going to pop down to tell her all about it. That’s news to Alan.

Meanwhile Caroline calls back and tells Gillian that Muriel didn’t even know about the wedding. She says she will have to face Armageddon with Celia because of letting Muriel know. Gillian tells Caroline that she offered to organize the wedding. Caroline hesitates but Gillian convinces her to help.

It's an impression you've given
It’s an impression you’ve given

Alone in their bedroom later, Celia complains about Muriel finding out. Alan says if you don’t want her at the wedding, we won’t invite her. Celia says why wouldn’t she want her there. Alan says, “It’s an impression you’ve given.”

Celia has a long list of old resentments about Muriel, which she airs to Alan.

In Harrogate, John arrives. He’s supposed to be taking Lawrence for the weekend.

Does she want it
Does she want it?

John says, “Just so you’re aware. Judith’s pregnant.” Caroline says, “How? Is it yours? Does she want it?” He stumbles and stutters a lot, and says things may be a little bit fraught and it isn’t a good weekend to take Lawrence. Lawrence gets in the car and won’t be moved.

Caroline goes to the farm. She arrives just as Robbie and his new girlfriend Cheryl (Rachel Leskovac) are leaving with Raff, Ellie and the baby.

I'm Robbie's other half
I’m Robbie’s other half

Caroline endears herself to Gillian by pronouncing Cheryl annoying. Caroline wants to take Gillian to lunch.

A wedding venue
A wedding venue

They pull into the same hotel where Caroline took Kate, but they are there to consider it as a possible venue for the wedding. They sit down for drinks and Caroline tells Gillian that Muriel stole a boy named Frank from her mom when they were younger. She married him. That’s two women who stole men from Celia. Ouch. And Celia does hold tight to her resentments.

A wedding planner gives them brochures and offers to take them round to look at the venue after lunch.

At Muriel’s, Celia and Alan conduct a conversation in the car, as they are prone to do. Celia doesn’t want her sister to know that her marriage was unhappy. She doesn’t want her sister to know that Caroline plays on the girl’s team. Both Alan and I find Muriel perfectly acceptable, but every word poor Muriel utters irritates Celia.

What does your daughter do, Alan?
What does your daughter do, Alan?

Over tea, Muriel thinks Celia must be proud of William, wants to know what Alan’s daughter does, wants to know about Caroline and John and is full of questions. When she leaves to make more tea Celia says, “I don’t know how much more of this I can take.”

Can we talk about packages and deals?
Can we talk about packages and deals?

The wedding planner shows Caroline and Gillian around, talks about deals, offers them champagne. They’ve already been drinking wine at lunch.

I'm going out
I’m going out

Judith (Ronni Ancona) tries to work as John and Lawrence watch TV in her tiny flat. She can’t concentrate and goes out. Lawrence thinks she’s too old to be pregnant. John follows Judith out the door, ostensibly because she shouldn’t be drinking.

Isn't he still doing his A levels?
Isn’t he still doing his A levels?

The conversation at Muriel’s moved to the garden, where they talk about Harry. Alan says he and Harry share a great grandchild, which makes Muriel ask about Raff still being in school and irritates Celia even more.

Caroline calls Celia to explain that she thinks Celia would love the hotel as a venue. The only available date is December 24. As Caroline is talking to her mother, Gillian realizes that the waiters and the wedding planner think that she and Caroline are the ones getting married. Celia asks Caroline to email photos as Gillian goes into a contagious giggling fit.

They think I'm another one of your women
They think I’m another one of your women

“They think you and I are getting married,” Gillian giggles. She acts coquettish with her hair, and says, “I’m going to finish with you if you aren’t careful.” Caroline continues the conversation with her mum by punctuating it with laughter, and can hardly say goodbye to her mother before she and Gillian burst out in loud guffaws. Another toast with champagne seems in order.

By nightfall, Gillian and Caroline must take a cab to the farm because they are both too drunk to drive.

Dad's gone
Dad’s gone

Lawrence calls his mom and asks to be picked up because his dad is gone. He says, “I”m sorry I said you were boring.” Caroline’s forgotten her phone at the hotel bar so she doesn’t get his message.

I booked two separate room.
I booked two separate rooms

At the farm, Gillian and Caroline flop on the couch side by side. Gillian asks what happened with Kate. Caroline says, “I booked two separate rooms for our romantic getaway.”

“You did not,” says Gillian.

Caroline says she’s tried to apologize but Kate won’t listen. “I really blew it. I only realize now how lovely it was. How precious. Now I’m in this box with bad written on it. But I’m not bad, just arrogant . . . inept . . . selfish . . . repressed . . . emotionally crippled.”

“What about you and Robbie?” Caroline asks. Gillian sits up, goes for more liquor.

Celia and Alan study the emailed photos of the hotel. Alan also looks at the photos on Muriel’s bedroom wall, including ones of Kenneth and Frank. He says Muriel seems fond of Celia, even though Celia isn’t fond of her. Celia drags out even more resentments about her sister. Alan has a more mature point of view. In a stroke of brilliance, he tells Celia that Muriel is very plain compared with her and hasn’t made him laugh even once.

Judith and John arrive back at her flat in the midst of a drunken argument. Lawrence is not there.

In Halifax, Gillian tells Caroline about going out with Robbie early on. She says she’s always been fond of him. But she says it will never work with Robbie.

“I’ve never told anyone this,” Gillian says.

I want to tell
I want to tell

“Don’t tell me something you’re gonna regret.”

“I want to tell. I  . . . I murdered him. Eddie. The only proper family Robbie ever had. I murdered him.”

He knocked me about.
He knocked me about.

Gillian talks about her marriage to Eddie. He beat her, pinned her down and burned her with cigarettes. She says she’s shed blood in every room of this house. He knocked her teeth out. He humiliated her in ways she won’t name. Caroline listens without speaking, but her face says volumes. Gillian thinks her Dad and Robbie know there was more to it than what she told the police.

Nicola Walker is stunning in this scene. Stunning. In a show filled with outstanding actors and acting, this powerful scene stands out. Amazing performances from both Nicola Walker and Sarah Lancashire.

In the morning Gillian wakes up on a couch in her living room. Caroline is asleep on the other. Gillian runs to the kitchen and throws up.

Pure terror
Pure terror

She turns to look at Caroline with terror on her face as she remembers what she confessed the night before.

The precipitating moment setting off the story of Last Tango in Halifax was the reunion of Celia and Alan. Alan leaving the farm set off a chain of external events for Gillian, leading directly to last night’s confession. Caroline’s journey, on the other hand, is internal. It began before Celia and Alan even found each other. Caroline and Gillian have been yin and yang every step of the way.

Yet, here they are, because of their parents, telling each other things they’ve never said to anyone before.

Feel like reading Orphan Black?

Orphan Black will be a comic book. IDW announced the new series recently. Here’s the first cover image by artist Nick Runge. The release will begin in early 2015.

One cover image for the upcoming Orphan Black comic book
First cover image for the upcoming Orphan Black comic book

And you thought Buffy comics were the only reason to visit the comic book store.

Give us more charming and lovely men on TV

It’s been fun watching Derek Jacobi on Sunday night’s on PBS. First in Last Tango in Halifax where he is a sweetheart of a man. Then in Vicious where he is a parody of a parody as half of a gay couple (with Ian McKellen).

I wrote this in last week’s recap of Last Tango in Halifax.

I know actors love the meaty parts, the villainous parts, because they are so much fun to act. I hope Derek Jacobi enjoys playing the charming and lovely Alan as much as I enjoy watching him at it. Charming, lovely male characters are so rare. We need more of them.

I want to expand on this idea.

Jacobi’s character in Last Tango in Halifax is kind, thoughtful, and generous. He’s supportive of the women in his life and of women in general. He’s the same way with the men in his life. I’m not sure when I’ve ever seen a man written quite this way in a film or TV show. Kudos to the show’s writer Sally Wainwright for creating Alan Buttershaw.

One reason why I love Last Tango in Halifax so much is because the relationship between Derek Jacobi and co-star Anne Reid is rare and beautiful. Not perfect, but perfectly loving. What a rare thing this is to see on television. Why isn’t there more of this? We need so desperately to see men who act this way held up before us as examples.

Vicious

Vicious, on the other hand, is over-the-top satire. It pokes fun at the way gay men have been portrayed in film and TV for years by taking it to the extreme. It’s ridiculous. It’s supposed to be. The two men have been together for decades, yet can do nothing but cut and jab at each other. Most of the time.

Both of these Derek Jacobi vehicles make a point. They both look at what a man is, what a man should be. One by offering a palpable example of good. One by showing us just how silly past stereotypes are.

It’s delightful watching Jacobi and McKellen do comedy. It isn’t something we see often. But I love the quiet message in Last Tango in Halifax more than the reverse-psychology message in Vicious. Not because Jacobi is playing a straight man in one and a gay man in the other. I’d love to see him play a gay man with as much character and love as we get to see in the Alan Buttershaw part. I have a feeling both he and McKellen would jump at a chance to play a part like that.

A Few Good Men

What we need are more examples of good men – both straight and gay. Good men instead of big-muscled killers. Good men instead of men who only use women as window dressing or as object.

Give us more good men.