Recap: Lost Girl S4, E9 Destiny’s Child

In the Lost Girl episode “Destiny’s Child,” we learn some long-held secrets and unravel some of season 4’s mysteries – or do we?

The welder on the train
The welder on the train

On the midnight train to some other plane of existence a welder works as the train falls to bits around him. The crown inscribed Isabeau sits beside him. Does this welder have something to do with Bo’s grandmother?

Bo (Anna Silk) gathers Trick (Rick Howland), Kenzi (Ksenia Solo), Lauren (Zoie Palmer) and Dyson (Kris Holden-Reid) in the Dal. She announces she’s ready to get to the bottom of whatever is going on.

What's in the bottle, Bo?
What’s in the bottle, Bo?

Bo brings out the bottle of dark matter she mailed herself. There’s arguing about what she should do with it. Bo is unimpressed with every other point of view but her own, and she takes the lid off the jar.

Black smoke drifts out of the jar, causing Trick pain. The smoke forms into this dude.

Friend or foe?
Friend or foe?

Bo asks if he’s friend or foe.

He introduces himself as Hugin (Jonathan Watton) and says he means no harm. He’s The Wanderer’s vessel, traveling from plane to plane. Bo knows they’ve met before and he says he and his brother Munin are the ones who took her away in a puff of black smoke. The brothers took Bo to their father’s train.

“Father?” asks Bo.

He answers yes, The Wanderer is a great man. Hugin mentions that his brother is the one who trapped him in the jar the moment Bo got on the train. Something to do with his brother lusting after his wife. He will help Bo get back to the train if she will help him take revenge against his brother and his backstabbing wife. Bo’s ready to go.

Kris and Lauren want to go, too. Hugin says no.

I love you both
I love you both

Bo turns to Lauren and Dyson and says, “I love you both, but right now I need you both to watch me walk away.” She touches both of them, looks them in the eyes, says, “It’s never going to get easier, is it?”

Off she goes in a puff of smoke.

Dyson takes off for the boxing ring to get a gun from his locker.

I brought my science
I brought science

Lauren walks in behind him and says, “I was getting my science stuff.”  Her jacket’s loaded up with vials and syringes. She’s ready to go kick some crow ass. (Hugin is a crow.) He gives her a knife, just in case. He looks at her carefully and says, “You know, I’m not sure if I could either.” What? asks Lauren. Choose, he answers.

I could choose
I could choose

“I could,” Lauren answers with a grin and a shrug. He laughs. He knows who she would choose. But what is this ambivalence he’s feeling? Is he attracted to the doctor?

Trick either has a headache or he’s thinking really hard. He gets up to leave. Kenzi and Tamsin (Rachel Skarsten) come in. They want help and answers. Trick is not helpful, in fact he’s pretty rude. There are insults and raised voices.

We need answers
We need answers, Trickopedia

Trick leaves. Kenzi and Tamsin decide to search Trick’s lair for something helpful.

Hugin and Bo rematerialize in a grave yard. He cautions her not to step on the graves or she’ll be sucked into hell by the Leviathan. She wants to get what they came for and get out of there. More crows appear, shifting into human form.

I wasn't expecting that
I did not see that coming

The first is Munin (Joris Jarsky), who considers Bo a pleasant surprise. He caws a few times and more crows fly in and take human shape. They recite a counting crows nursery rhyme until they reach “7 is the devil.”

A murder of crows
A murder of crows

Bo likes the odds. Hugin’s wife appears. Marital spats sizzle between them.

All we need now is Trick's blood
All we need now is Trick’s blood

Kenzi and Lauren scour Trick’s lair and find a blank book. Kenzi says, “This is it. We have to write in this book with Trick’s blood.” She’s sure he’s hiding an inkwell of blood somewhere. Back to searching.

Trick pays a call on Dao Ming (Jadyn Wong). She’s one of those Fae with long curvy fingernails who make you tell the truth no matter what.

Are you lying to me?
Are you trying to lie to me

Trick needs answers and he wants her help to release a blocked memory. She says no. He offers to pay. She still says no. Finally he says, you hate the person who’s blocked this memory. Who might that be, she asks. “Me,” answers Trick. She finds that interesting. She will help get the truth, no matter how painful.

The murder of crows have Bo and Hugin cornered. Bo’s ready to fight, but Hugin switches sides, kisses his wife, and laughs at tricking her. Now when he refers to The Wanderer as his “father” they all laugh. Their former employer has a particular interest in Bo, but he’s not a parent to these feathered fellows.

Let's slit her throat
Let’s slit her throat

They intend to kill her – slit her throat – but wanted to have the fun of tricking her first.

Sorry to disappoint you
Sorry to disappoint you

Bo folds her arms and falls into a grave, descending straight into the Netherworld below. “I did not see that coming,” says Munin.

In the cavelike Netherworld Bo calls out to an echoing voice to show itself. It’s the Leviathan (Jennifer Dale). The Leviathan irritates Bo by calling her Princess. Bo irritates her right back by calling her Levi.

The Leviathan
The Leviathan

Levi clamps a hand on Bo’s “hand hickey” and falls to the ground. Where did you get that mark? Bo says it came from some guy on a train.

Levi’s searched for that mark for 600 years. It was supposed to be hers. She wants it. She needs it.

Bo just wants to know where the door is. Well, shucks, no one ever leaves here the Leviathan claims. Give me the mark, says Levi. Bo will fight for it. She draws a knife.

Levi wants a game of riddles. Another way to fight. Okay. Riddle on.

Bo quickly solves Levi’s first riddle with the help of some audio visuals.

Getting the truth out of Trick takes work
Getting the truth out of Trick takes work

We’re back to getting the truth out of Trick, which isn’t easy. He admits to massacres. He admits to loving himself more than Isabeau.

Tamsin finds a loose floorboard. Under it is a Japanese folding box. It’s impossible that Trick has one.

A magical box
A magical box

The box is magical. You must know how to open it. Kenzi thinks blood is hidden in it; they agree to open the box.

The riddler
The riddler

Bo comes up with a riddle: “She’s brilliant. He’s strong. Her life is little. His life is long. Both loves are pure. Both loves are true. If you were I, who would you choose?”

Levi says, “The man. He will live longer.”

“Final answer?”

“No. The woman. You love her. You wear her humanity like a shield.”

“So we’re stickin’ with the woman?”

“No, wait. The man. You crave strength.”

Bo shakes her head no. She demands to be sent back up.

The Levi wants to know if the answer was the woman. Bo says that as far as she knows there is no answer. Levi agrees to send Bo back above ground, even though she cheats at riddles, because very soon someone Bo loves will be dead. That doesn’t sound good.

Bo hides behind a grave stone as Hugin and Munin discuss the train and making lots of money from it. She steps out from hiding and tosses a crow into a grave. Then a couple more. Then another. Finally all that’s left are Hugin, Munin and Hugin’s wife: 3 for a girl.

Hugin thinks Bo’s still outnumbered.

Dyson arrives with tooth and fang
Dyson arrives with tooth and fang

Dyson appears and nabs Hugin.

Loaded for crow
Loaded for crow with the syringe of science

Lauren arrives with a syringe in each hand and nabs Munin. The wife runs. Munin didn’t see that coming.

Bo tells Heckle and Jeckle she wants to get back on that train. Now. Dyson and Lauren chime in with descriptions of the excruciating things they can do to the Fae body. Persuaded, the brothers will get her on the train if they can leave immediately after they get here there.

Dyson and Lauren want to go with Bo. She says she has to do it alone, even though they are her family.

Catch, lover.
Catch, lover

Bo blows a kiss more or less half way between where Lauren and Dyson are standing. She says, “Catch, lover,” and splits. After the smoke clears, Lauren says, “You know that kiss was for me, right?” Yeah, right is Dyson’s opinion. You have to admire Lauren’s confidence since, as far as we know, Dyson is the only one who’s been shooting off fireworks with Bo in the last few weeks.

Do you have any idea how powerful I am?
Do you have any idea how powerful I am?

Dao Ming asks Trick to tell the worst thing he’s ever done. He agonizes, then laughs and goes on the attack, saying he could write her right out of history like he did Rainer. When he mentions Rainer, the environment shakes, the wind blows. Trick says, “That’s it. I remember who The Wanderer is.  How he came to be. What he is now. . . . I created all of this, didn’t I?”

Dao Ming says even with your power, you cannot escape fate. She laughs at him because even though he can change the future, he cannot change his nature. He leaves to warn Bo.

The ritual of opening the Japanese box has moved to the stage where Kenzi and Tamsin have the box nearly demolished. Finally they find the vials of blood.

Here's blood in your eye.
Here’s blood in your eye.

There’s the blood, right in front of Kenzi’s eyes. Have we seen a close up of Ksenia Solo’s eyes in every episode? It seems like it.

They drag out the blank book.

Fingerpainting
Fingerpainting

Kenzi dribbles blood on a page and uses some of it to write BO. Nothing happens until Tamsin touches the blob of blood and picks up the book.

Oh, oh, Tam Tam
Oh, oh, Tam Tam

Tamsin can’t let go of the book. Her arms shake. The pages flip wildly. Her name appears 3 times on a blank page, written in blood.

Valyrie time
Valkyrie time

Tamsin goes skelator and says, “I must take his soul. It belongs to me.”

Tamsin’s back in a conversation she and Trick had several hundred years ago. She flashes back to it as she holds the book.

Tamsin knelt over a body and Trick, dressed in Blood King garb, stood above her. He doesn’t want her to take the soul. She says it’s a warrior’s soul and she must take it. It is written. He knows what will happen if she doesn’t take it.

Trick calls her a vulture and says she overstates her importance. She says her lives are ending. Trick thinks her soul is damned to hell.

Don't you want new life?
I want new life

He asks Tamsin if she wants new life. More than anything, she answers. If I had more time, I would cleanse my soul and wipe my sins away.

Trick will give her new life, but for payment, he must have the soul of the dead warrior at his feet. Trick wants to curse him with his blood for arrogance, for thinking he can change the laws of the King. His soul will wander in eternity. “No one will remember his name. No one will remember Rainer, the defiant.” He turns and spits on the body.

Tamsin agrees. Trick cuts his hand and seals the deal with his blood.

Kenzi finds a big hammer and knocks the book out of Tamsin’s hands. Tamsin collapses. Kenzi attempts to revive her by saying Tammy about 20 times while patting Tamsin’s face. When Tamsin finally wakes up, she says, “Whatever you do, don’t trust Trick.”

Bo’s on the train. She finds the welder. She asks if he’s Rainer.

Are you The Wanderer?
Are you The Wanderer?

He takes off his jacket and mask. Bo pulls her knife and says, “Are you The Wanderer?”

Not what I was expecting
Not what Bo was expecting

When Bo sees his face (Kyle Schmid) she almost smiles. Then she attacks. They grapple over the knife, which he knocks away.

He puts his hand on her chest, guides her hand to his chest.

The laying on of hands
The laying on of hands

They are mark to mark. Bo touches his hand on her chest and smiles.

Lauren and Dyson are pacing the floor at the Dal. Trick tells them he knows who The Wanderer is: his mortal enemy Rainer.

Bo walks in with a cheerful, “Hey, guys.” She assures them she’s okay – great – never better. She says she found out why she agreed to be dark. It was her idea actually, so she would move heaven and earth to get back on that train. To Rainer. Willingly.

Trick is looking like, what?

Bo says she needed to break Rainer’s curse and free him from the train. She apologizes for putting everyone through everything.

Trick says, “It’s him. That’s Rainer.”

Rainer comes in to stand beside Bo.

He's my destiny
He’s my destiny

Bo says, “I did all of this because he’s not my enemy. He’s definitely not my father.” Bo takes his hand, smiles. “He’s my destiny.”

Personal Thoughts

  • This destiny thing doesn’t work for me. It’s episode 9 of the season. There are 4 episodes left in season 4 and we haven’t heard anything about a renewal for season 5 (please, a renewal). They are not going to introduce a brand new character now who is Bo’s destiny – at least not her true love kind of destiny, which is what she’s implying with her smiling and touching. Therefore, I’m considering this another misdirection in a season stuffed with them.
  • The tale of Trick’s curse creating the wandering soul rings true. He has shown numerous signs of being power mad. What an interesting twist to have Trick be the source of all this mayhem around The Wanderer. And remember the crown next to Rainer on the train? What did that have to do with Trick’s curse on the wandering soul?
  • High marks to the writers for linking Tamsin to the creation of The Wanderer. In this season when she was reborn, her wings appeared. According to Massimo, that means she is again on her last life after her life renewals from the Blood King all those years ago. When she vowed back then to cleanse her soul and wipe away her sins, she didn’t do it. But in Tamsin’s current life, she is trying to atone for her sins.
  • The Blood King has some soul searching to do, too. Will he?

Review: August: Osage County

There are many films that can make you feel as if you’ve been assaulted by life, by pain, by damage and abuse, by hurt. August: Osage County is one of these. It peers into the way abuse and pain carries down, almost intact, from one generation to the next. In this particular story, the damage is inflicted by the women.

The drive to the funeral in August: Osage County
The drive to the funeral in August: Osage County

The story begins with a father’s death. Sam Shepard as the Oklahoma poet Beverly Weston dies. The family gathers. Meryl Streep plays Violet Weston, the not-exactly-grieving widow and mother to Julia Roberts, Julianne Nicholson, and Juliette Lewis.

Violet Weston has cancer of the mouth, both physically and metaphorically. She’s addicted to about 11 different prescription drugs, which she pops with malicious intensity. The drugs do not have pleasant effect on her behavior.

Julianne Nicholson as Ivy is the daughter who stayed in Oklahoma, near her parents. Julianne Nicholson’s performance in this part is quiet and nuanced and complete perfection, especially when contrasted with the overblown emotionalism of some of the other characters. Okay, not some of the other characters; Meryl Streep’s character. She seemed too big somehow, too much.

I’m sure Meryl Streep intended her to be too big and too much. The woman doesn’t make mistakes. Violet Weston was too big and too much on purpose, I’m guessing.

Eating on the porch
Eating on the porch

Julia Roberts drives in with her husband, played by Ewan McGregor, a buttoned down kind of man, and her 14 year old daughter, played by Abigail Breslin. Her marriage is breaking up. Julia Roberts is simply wonderful in this part. She’s the eldest daughter – strong and bitter and angry. She’s the wronged wife with a cheating husband. She’s the protective mother whose 14 year old daughter attracts the attentions of her sister’s smarmy fiancé, played by Dermot Mulroney. She’s a wounded lioness, just like her mother, with sharp teeth and powerful claws.

Juliette Lewis has her own coping mechanisms for dealing with her family. Get as far away as possible, pin all sorts of unrealistic hopes and wishful thinking on a man, and pretend the realities of her upbringing never happened.

Add to this menagerie of family Violet’s sister, Mattie Fae, played expertly by Margo Martindale. She’s married to Chris Cooper. Like Violet’s husband, Mattie Fae’s husband is a kind and tender man. How did these two sisters manage to find such good men to marry? They have a mother-whipped cowering mess of a son played by Benedict Cumberbatch.

Bring all these characters together for a funeral, make them stay together for several days, and all hell breaks loose.

I want to give a particular mention to Misty Upham, who plays a Native American woman hired by Beverly to cook and clean just before he goes missing. (Perhaps you remember her from Frozen River, where she had a bigger part.) Misty Upham needs to be pulled out of the Native American niche and put into other roles. She’s terrific and should be given parts that aren’t so bound by ethnicity. Hey, Jinji Kohan, how about giving her a part in Orange is the New Black where actresses are judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters?

This story is brilliant in its specificity. It’s filled with outstanding performances. Any awards that go to August: Osage County are deserved. Like a lot of movies that deal with harsh reality, it’s hard to watch at times, even though it has moments of redemption and beauty.

I recommend August: Osage County wholeheartedly. It’s not the kind of movie you want to watch more than once, but it is the kind of movie that should be watched.

Watch This: Trailer for August: Osage County

August: Osage County opens in wide distribution today. Are you going to be there? I can’t wait!

First Impressions of Intelligence and Killer Women

Intelligence and Killer Women both opened their seasons this week. Here are my first impressions.

Intelligence

Intelligence touts Josh Holloway as the lead character, Gabriel Vaughn. He’s a government operative with a computer embedded in his brain and is considered the government’s most valuable asset. It’s on CBS.

The main cast of Intelligence
The main cast of Intelligence. Image via CBS

Behind this computer-man are Riley Neal (Meghan Ory) as the secret service agent in charge of keeping Vaughn safe and out of enemy hands, and Lillian Strand (Marg Helgenberger) who is head of the cyber security agency that manages Vaughn.

I am always interested in shows like this that take a look at the direction we are heading with technology. The technology here is dazzling, if unrealistic, and gives the series an awesomeness vibe that should serve it well in future episodes.

In the lead, Holloway is stubbornly human in spite of his computer chip of a brain, which makes the story interesting. Ory is tough and capable and in sympathy with Holloway’s tendency to be human. Helgenberger seemed a bit stiff and stoic, but perhaps that’s a requirement of the role.

It’s an action story with fighting and guns and international intrigue mixed in with the government operations and human interaction. I was happy with the first episode and think it promises to be an interesting ride.

Killer Women

On ABC, Tricia Helfer leads the cast on Killer Women. She’s Molly Parker, a Texas Ranger who works on murder cases where women are the murderers.

Molly Parker in Killer Women
Tricia Helfer in Killer Women. Image via ABC.

Molly is a bundle of complexity, which is always good in a character. She’s trying to get her husband to sign divorce papers while conducting an affair with an FBI guy played by Marc Blucas. (I’ll bet if you counted them all up, Marc Blucas has been the love interest for more leading women in television than any other actor.)

Molly’s living at her brother’s while getting the divorce. The brother (Michael Trucco) may play an important role in the series since he was all over the premier.

Molly is more interested in justice than in closing cases. Get this. She plays the trumpet in a band when she’s not working a case – that’s a new twist on a character.

The shots of Austin and what I assumed are San Antonio looked real, although IMDB says the show was filmed in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I saw the Frost Bank building in Austin and the state capitol building in Austin, and the highway scenes showed green vegetation beside the roads – not something you’d see in the New Mexico desert. I sure looks like it was filmed in Texas.

Much as I liked the main character and Tricia Helfer as a Texas Ranger, some of the situations were a little unrealistic. For example, Helfer and Blucas take off to Mexico, completely unofficially,  to rescue some people and while there they shoot people without any apparent consequences. Drug cartel people, so shooting them doesn’t count or something – right? Action heroes in movies shoot people without consequences all the time, but I seldom see women doing it.

Killer Women has my interest so far and I’ll continue to watch.

Did you watch either of these premier episodes? What were your impressions?

Recommended: McLeod’s Daughters

McLeod’s Daughters ran for 224 episodes in Australia, lasting for 8 seasons. A show that popular for that long must have something going for it. It’s a female-centric drama. The original premise of the show was that half sisters Claire and Tess McLeod run a farm after their father’s death. The help that works the farm with them are all women. Posie Graeme-Evans developed the series.

I’m still working through the first season (22 episodes) of the show. It’s like a modern day American western with cattle, horses and sheep, hard work, adversity, personal dramas, and women.

Herding the sheep
Herding the sheep

The show was filmed in South Australia and most of the outdoor scenes are panoramic and beautiful.

I’m giving it a recommendation based on what I’ve seen so far. I’m liking the characters and the stories. I like to see so many women listed in the credits for writing, producing, and directing along with the female faces in front of the cameras.

The cast in season 1 is what has hooked me, and I intend to continue watching this interesting series. However, reviews and summaries of the show indicate that some seasons were more or less popular depending on the cast and storylines each season. Wikipedia has a good summary of the cast changes, awards, popularity and episodes of this long-running story.

Lisa Chappell as Claire McLeod
Lisa Chappell as Claire McLeod

When we first learn about Drovers Run, the farm, it’s in the hands of Claire McLeod, who is struggling to keep it afloat after her father’s death and to earn the respect of the help and the townspeople as she tries to run a farm. She’s the heart of the show and the heart of the farm, but Lisa Chappell left the show after 3 seasons. I’ll have to see what I think when I get that far in about continuing to marathon it without her in the lead. I thought I’d never watch Gray’s Anatomy again after Katherine Heigl left or after they canned Brooke Smith, but I’m still watching! I think it may be the same with McLeod’s Daughters, because I’m sold on it so far.

Bridie Carter as Tess McLeod
Bridie Carter as Tess McLeod

Claire’s half sister Tess shows up after their father’s death. The sisters haven’t seen each other for 20 years. Claire wants to sell all or part of the farm so she can buy a cafe. When she sees how things are on the farm and what Claire is up against, she decides to stay a while and help.

Sonia Todd as Meg
Sonia Todd as Meg

I especially like the grounded and efficiently wise character Meg, who has worked at Drovers Run for years. Her daughter Jodi gets roped into working there as well.

Rachael Carpani as Jodi
Rachael Carpani as Jodi

Jodi is young and wants to move to the city and be in the fashion industry, so you can imagine how well chasing bulls and hunting wild pigs goes over with her.

Jessica Napier as Becky
Jessica Napier as Becky

The final main female character in season 1 is Becky, who is a town girl who finds her job at the farm a safe haven after she’s raped early in the season.

There’s no lack of relationship issues, struggles with all sorts of adversity, and suspense to keep every episode I’ve seen so far moving along with lightning speed. There are the rich neighbors with two available sons to offer some potential romance for the McLeod sisters, as well as various blokes who offer some relationship interest to the other women.

The series is on streaming services like Netflix  and Amazon Instant video now. There are DVDs for each season. The website has more information.

Have you seen this series? What did you think of it?

Recap: Lost Girl S4, E8 Groundhog Fae

People are crazy and times are strange.
– Bob Dylan

In “Groundhog Fae,” episode 8 of Lost Girl, Bo kisses Tamsin about 50 times while Kenzi kisses Hale about 500 times. Lauren, Dyson and Vex become besties on Bo’s bed while discussing Bo’s box. It’s the Lost Girl Christmas show!

In the Lost Girl universe, it’s summer time. We’ll get to what that has to do with Christmas later. In the meantime, we begin with objectified boobs at the car wash/gas station.

Working at the car wash
Working at the car wash

Lauren lusts after this marvel of nature as melting ice cream runs in a wet slide down her hand. No need to be subtle on Lost Girl, just put it all out there. At least until Hale shows up to snap his fingers and bring everyone out of their Bo induced carwash hallucination.

She's mesmerized all right
Mesmerized by Bo

Seems washing cars is therapy for Bo since she’s failed in her attempts to find the hell shoes. It’s Fae Yule night when Krampus comes to “slide down your chimney on the hottest night of the year,” according to Lauren (Zoie Palmer). Bo (Anna Silk) says that sounds like her kind of elf. Boy, is she wrong there.

Bo took a piece of candy when she paid for the gas, ate it, and now she’s so sleepy she’s letting Hale (K.C. Collins) drive. Bo climbs in the back seat and Lauren and Dyson (Kris Holden-Ried) shove it out to see who gets to sit in back with her. Lauren wins. Oddly, Lauren and Dyson are acting friendly toward each other.

I called it, Wolfie
I called it, Wolfie

In the gas station, a creepy fellow and his short assistant dump a dude who made the mistake of eating a piece of their candy into an abyss that somehow opens under the hood of a car.

Trick (Rick Howland) reads about the legend of Krampus to Kenzi (Ksenia Solo) who has had enough of the Stephanie Meyer literature and changes the subject to decorating for Yule. Trick continues that Yule is a celebration of contrition. We are going to have contrition aplenty tonight.

Dyson and Lauren come into the clubhouse, compliment Kenzi on her decorations. She only wants to know where Hale is.

Buy a girl a drink first, horny
Buy a girl a drink first, horny

Hale comes in with a Krampus sack, wearing horns. Kenzi is most welcoming, so much so that Lauren and Dyson have to issue throat clearing reminders about their presence. Bo doesn’t come in with everyone else. Where is she? They don’t notice her absence and drink a toast to Bo to show that “she is not alone.”

Bo wakes up in the car when the radio comes on. She’s no longer dressed in her wet car washing outfit. She has on a dress and boots and doesn’t know why everyone abandoned her in the car. Bo goes into the clubhouse. She passes by a couple kissing in what passes for an entryway, sees Bruce (Rob Archer) chugging beer with a woman as muscular as he is, and is approached by Choga (Darryl Hinds), who is one of those frog fae whose sweat gives you super powers. He offers Bo a lick.

Care for a lick?
Care for a lick?

Bruce interrupts his drinking to push Choga away and say hello to Bo.

Hello, bo
Nobody gets in Bruce’s way

Happy Yule, Bruce tells her.

Do we give Bo the box?
Do we give Bo the box?

In Bo’s bedroom, Lauren and Dyson discuss a box which came addressed to the dark archives in care of Bo and covered in Bo’s handwriting. Lauren opened it. They argue about whether or not to give the box to Bo. Bo discovers them and complains that they left her alone in the car, feeding her growing abandonment issues. They hide the box.

Vex (Paul Amos) comes in, wearing Bo’s corset. Bo yells for Kenzi and leaves. Lauren thinks she, Dyson and Vex are going to need more booze. They are downing shots as quickly as they can.

Kenzi and Hale make out in Kenzi’s bedroom. Kenzi breaks away because her Kenzi-senses are tingling. Hale makes an attempt at a brilliant 100% guaranteed foreplay remark which falls flat with Kenzi. He says, “Ignore that. I’ll do better next time.”

Downstairs, Bo talks to Krampus (R.D. Reid), only she doesn’t know he’s Krampus yet. She’s complaining about being abandoned in the car, calls Lauren and Dyson the new wonder twins. She says, “Okay, maybe I’m running out of excuses not to get back on that train. Why am I telling you this?”

Krampus puts on Groucho Marx glasses and says, “Sometimes we only have to see what’s staring us in the face.”

I'm so sorry
I’m so sorry

Tamsin enters, neatly ducks a ball just as it flies past her head, tells Bo, “I’m so sorry,” and kisses her. Bo wants to know what that was for. Tamsin says, “Doesn’t matter, you’re not going to remember in about 3 seconds.”

Bo is back in the car, waking up to the sound of the radio. She jumps out, goes back inside to pass by the kissing couple, see the beer chugging, get offered a lick of frog sweat, thanks Bruce for pushing the guy away. This time when Bruce walks off dissonant music plays when he passes by a particular wall which seems to magically contain the little guy from the gas station. It’s Jeffrey (Ken Hall) and he’s Krampus, Jr.

Bo sees Tamsin and says, “Yo, Valkyrie lips, what was that?” Tamsin is surprised Bo remembers that’s she’s been through this before.

Tamsin goes all Bill Murray
Tamsin goes all Bill Murray

Tamsin gives Bo the Bill Murray version of what’s about to happen as she points to various recurring events around the room. Tamsin’s been on repeat even longer than Bo, telling people they’re stuck in some sort of quantum paradox, but no one believes her.

“Then you and I kissed,” Tamsin says. They shrug. Since Bo remembers it’s groundhog day fae, they try kissing again. Nothing happens. Bo says, “Nada.” Tamsin reveals her longing for the succubus, and says, “Speak for yourself.”

A couple of episodes back, Tamsin announced that the way Bo makes her feel is what love feels like.  She always had the hots for Bo, but she’s being nice about it since her rebirth. In her previous life, she had the hots for Bo but covered it over with snark and anger. I’m wondering if the feelings Tamsin is developing (or acknowledging honestly) this season will make her a powerful ally for Bo in whatever eventually happens in the meeting with The Wanderer and the conflict between light and dark that is developing in Bo.

Rinse and repeat. This round in the time loop, Bruce is missing, Bo punches the frog sweat guy, and decides to have some fun of her own.

Chug it Tamsin
Chug it Tamsin

Fun for Bo includes betting on Tamsin’s chugging ability and arm wrestling Bruce’s buff drinking partner. Bo wins. Of course.

They won't remember
Will anyone remember?

Fun also includes more kissing with Tamsin, because who’s going to even remember? Plus, Tamsin really gets into it.

Lauren and Dyson decide to drink to decide whether or not to tell Bo about the box.

Drinking to decide
Drinking to decide

Lauren should get to decide because she loves Bo. Down a drink. No, Dyson should get to decide because he sacrificed his love to save Bo. Down a drink. Lauren admits Bo wants the truth. Drink. Dyson thinks Bo can handle herself and her destiny. Drink. Vex thinks they should present their cases to him. Then Vex will decide who is most worthy of Bo’s box.

Heart to heart
Heart to heart

Bo wakes up in the car again as time restarts itself. She and Tamsin sit by the fire for a heart to heart talk this time around. I can’t help noticing once again that Kenzi is off in a kissing loop and Lauren and Dyson are drinking with each other in Bo’s bedroom. None of them are there for Bo. Tamsin is. Tamsin is not only there, she gives Bo vulnerable, longing looks. Tamsin says, “There’s something I need to talk to you about.”

Bo is distracted by Krampus, Jr. pulling another person into the magic wall with him. Party goers are disappearing into the wall at an alarming rate.

BAM, Bo’s back in the car and time restarts. Bo asks Tamsin to tell her everything she did on the way to the party. Seems she stopped at a gas station to buy a pack of gum. They decide to look for Trick to get the Yule story info.

Dyson tells Vex and Lauren about the first time he met Bo and how he gave her the chi injection she needed to save herself.

I gave her chi when she needed it
I gave her chi when she needed it

He figures that makes him responsible for her being here, so he should get to choose what to do with her box. You have to admire actors who can say shit like that with a straight face.

I love her
I love her

Lauren, who is well and truly drunk, says, “When I first met Bo she didn’t know her hole from an ass in the ground.” Lauren curbed Bo’s murderous hunger, plus she loves her and that should give her extra votes. She thinks they should throw the box in the fire.

Dyson says why are we fighting? Lauren smiles at him. He wants to hug it out with the doctor.

These two are best buddies now
These two are best buddies now

Dyson says later that he hasn’t hated her for a long time. She says, “You’re the only one who gets my predicament, Wolfie. And, you make me laugh.” Smiling and hugging and chemistry between Lauren and Dyson. It’s happening whether you want it or not.

Lauren is going to reattach Vex’s hand. Right now. Drunk surgery.

You're pretty
You’re pretty

Bo and Tamsin find Trick sleeping in the bathtub. He’s drunk and useless. He does think Tamsin’s pretty, so maybe he’s not completely brain dead.

BAM. Back to the car.

Practice makes perfect
Practice makes perfect

Kenzi and Hale make out in her bedroom. He continues to search for a remark that will turn her on, not drive her away mad, but he’s not doing well at it. Three or four more time restarts and he reads to her from a book of poetry. Success. She likes it.

A condom bonanza
A condom bonanza

Kenzi gets out her “first time with a Fae box from Bo” to reveal a selection of condoms. Hale gets a sudden case of performance anxiety and checks his watch.

The 9th time Bo and Tamsin wake up Trick from his bathtub bed, Bo asks him why he hasn’t told her about The Wanderer. He says, “Because I’m terrified.”

Restart time. Bo and Tamsin try talking to Hale and discover that he knows about the time loop. He says, “Oh, Krampus got  you, too?”

Seems Krampus plays tricks on people every year during Yule. Hale thinks it’s harmless. Bo says, we just saw some guy get sucked into the wallpaper. Hale says Krampus feeds on regret.

Krampas, Jr. will get you
Krampus, Jr. will get you

Bo goes downstairs to confront Jeffrey, AKA Krampus, Jr., at the wall. Tamsin gets sucked into the wall. Hale says Krampus is just a kindly prankster who whisks naughty children to candy land. He says they should go back to where they first met up with him to find him.

Things are back to normal time, which Hale says means Krampus has found someone with enough regret to tide him over. Bo leaves for the gas station. Hale gives her a big knife.

Who's the Yule fool now?
Who’s the Yule fool now?

Kenzi is in her bedroom, her feelings hurt because she discovered that Hale was practicing his wooing in the time loop. She says, “How many times did we?” He says, “Not once.” He says he just wanted to make it perfect because he cares about her.

I like you, you know.
Why can’t they figure out how to light K.C. Collins?

She forgives him; they make up.

Bo jumps into the abyss at the gas station. She discovers a conveyor belt where people go in one end and candy comes out the other. Tamsin is strapped on the conveyor belt. Tamsin says, “I’ve been naughty. Now I’ll be candy.” Bruce wanders by, sad because he has to wait to be candy.

I'll be candy
I’ll be candy

Bo says, “Listen up, brainwashed Betty,” and gives Tamsin a lecture about not having regrets. Tamsin says, “If they make me into a lollipop, I want you to have the first lick.” Bo sticks the big knife in the works and gets Tamsin off the soylent green candy machine.

This is just bad Christmas
This is just bad Christmas

Jeffrey shows up and Bo yells at him about how he’s ruining Christmas. He says the Valkyrie is his, and sure enough she seems stuck to the floor. Tamsin confesses she’s the reason The Wanderer found Bo.

The Valkyrie meets The Wanderer
The Valkyrie meets The Wanderer

A quick flashback to a previous life, in which Tamsin hunts Fae fugitives. The Wanderer comes to her with eyes of pure evil. He wants her to find a woman that Tamsin doesn’t think could exist: her eyes both brown and blue, virtuous yet lustful, neither dark nor light – yet both.

You weren't supposed to be real
You weren’t supposed to be real

Tamsin can’t stand that she helped that monster find Bo. She’d rather be candy than what she is. Bo says, “None of that matters. I forgive you.”

Jeffrey comes back and says, “Admit you ate that candy.” Bo finally gets the connection between everything that’s happened and eating the piece of candy from the gas station.

Seems Jeffrey wants a sacrifice. He likes Tamsin’s regrets. Papa Krampus turns everyone loose except Bo. He likes her darkness. There’s enough darkness in her to make candies for centuries. She’s full of guilt and denial and the kind of complexity that makes great candy.

Krampas and his soylent candy store
Krampus and his soylent candy store

He straps her to the conveyor belt. She can’t be free unless she faces her truth and confronts her fears.

Bo admits she's afraid
Bo admits she’s afraid

She says, “Yes, I’m scared. I’m scared of making the wrong choice. Of losing my friends and my family again. I’m terrified of what I’ll become. I’m terrified of what I’m capable of. I’m terrified of The Wanderer and what he’ll make me.”

With that, Krampus frees her. She lands next to Tamsin still saying, “I’m scared.” Tamsin says, “I’ve got you,” and hugs her.

Bo wakes up in the car one last time, with Tamsin looking at her.

Is The Wanderer my father?
Is The Wanderer my father?

Bo asks Tamsin about the evil thing that got her, The Wanderer. Could he be Bo’s father?

That "thing" would do anything
That “thing” would do anything

Tamsin says, “That thing would do anything to claim its ideal mate. Even if it meant creating her himself.” Mate. She used the word mate. The plot line for The Wanderer is driving me crazy!

Kenzi pops in, asks how Bo is. Tamsin calls Kenzi mom. Kenzi says Lauren’s gone off to sew Vex’s hand back on. It’s past midnight and light and dark can’t be at the same Yule party so Tamsin leaves, Kenzi goes back inside and Bo stays with the car. Kenzi says, Oh, yeah, I found this box on your bed where Dyson passed out.

This was on your bed
This was on your bed

Bo opens the box and sees a glass container of something dark.

Personal Thoughts

  • Hello to Groundhog Day. Hello to Soylent Green. Hello to Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. There were references to Keebler elves and Stephanie Meyer and other pop culture trivia in this episode. It’s as if we don’t know how to tell a story without pop culture to ground us and give us fodder for jokes.
  • Here’s the Krampus folklore as opposed to the St. Nicholas folklore.
  • Now that they finally built a set for Kenzi’s bedroom, we get to see it in every episode! We also have a set for a garage in this episode. Bo had to have somewhere to wake up whenever the time loop reset. The clubhouse is growing.
  • I’m happy to see Lauren interacting with Evony, with Dyson, with Vex. Zoie Palmer was really limited in what she could do when she only had an occasional scene with Bo. More Lauren is always a good thing. Plus, Lauren is funny when she’s not busy being in love with Bo.
  • It was nice to have the grown up Tamsin present and prominent in this episode. Almost makes up for her being missing so much in the previous episodes.
  • Here’s a little present from Rachel Skarsten

     

Downton Abbey season 4: Comments are Open

Downton Abbey returned to PBS for season 4 last night. I’m not going to recap it here, but I did want to open up this post to reader comments about season 4. As the weeks go by, please feel free to use the comments here to share your thoughts with me and other readers.

The first comment shall be mine. It was lovely to see everyone back again doing the things we love them for much for doing. Hurrah!

Much of the first episode was about grief. My other comment is that it’s a little simplified to think that grief can be overcome in such ways as those demonstrated here, but it’s also a bit exaggerated to think that grief can be so overwhelming that life stops.

What are your thoughts?

Review: What Maisie Knew

What Maisie Knew is based on the Henry James novel of 1897. It stars Julianne Moore and Steve Coogan as Maisie’s horrifyingly bad parents. Maisie is played by Onata Aprile.

What Maisie Knew poster
What Maisie Knew poster

Alexander Skarsgård and Joanna Vanderham are also in the film. After Maisie’s parents divorce, her father marries the former nanny (Joanna Vanderham). Her mother marries a convenient bartender (Alexander Skarsgård) and these two surrogate parents are left largely in charge of the neglected and forgotten Maisie.

Moore and Coogan do not sugar coat their performances as the unlikeable adults. They are as selfish and unfit as two people could possible be to fill their roles as parents.

Like the book, the film is told from Maisie’s point of view. Onata Aprile is remarkable as Maisie. She’s  natural and real, completely childlike rather than actory. It’s hard to remember she’s performing – saying lines, taking direction. She absolutely makes the film work. It breaks our hearts as we watch her trying to survive in her often awful situation.

Like all neglected children, Maisie loves her parents. But when she’s with Margo, daddy’s new wife, or Lincoln, mommie’s new husband, Maisie recognizes that this is the way it’s supposed to be. Lincoln bumbles his way into child care – he doesn’t even know that you should hold a child’s hand when you cross a Manhattan street. But he does naturally all the things her mother does not do. He listens to her, he plays with her, he makes sure she has something to eat.

If a film about something so depressing can be called beautiful, this is a beautiful film. The performances are outstanding, the way the camera follows Maisie and lives in her world is brilliant. The ending is emotionally satisfying even though it is unrealistic to expect Maisie’s situation to be wrapped up in a red bow for any length of time.

The film was released on DVD in May 2013 and is available on most streaming services now.

Watch This: Theatrical Trailer for Veronica Mars

Although we’ve been getting all kinds of pre-release peeks at Veronica Mars, this is the first actual official trailer. It gives you a lot more insight into what’s going on in the movie’s plot.

Bring it!

Watch This: Sex After Kids Trailer

Saw a tweet from Zoie Palmer about this trailer and thought it was worth sharing. A lot of familiar faces in this comedy, plus it looks really funny.

The difficulty for those of us in the U.S. is that I don’t know where it’s playing. It’s been on the festival circuit in Canada, Australia and the U.S., but I’m not sure about release in theaters. According to the Sex After Kids website, it has shown in some U.S. theaters, but they don’t have a 2014 calendar update (or didn’t on the day I looked.)

Sex After Kids – Redband Trailer from Jeremy LaLonde on Vimeo.

Follow @SexAfterKids on Twitter for updates such as this one: