Watch This: Trailer for the Short Film One Billion Rising

One Billion Rising is an event organized by Eve Ensler of The Vagina Monologues. The film is a short about the event in 2013. Another event is planned for Valentine’s Day 2014.

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Amy Poehler and Natasha Lyonne and Old People: I’m Excited

The news is that Amy Poehler received the go ahead for a new comedy on NBC, tentatively called Old Soul. The series will star Orange is the New Black sensation Natasha Lyonne as a young woman working as an aide to a group of old people.

According to this report in Deadline,

 “This show, hopefully, will blow up some of the cliches we think about old people,” NBC chairman Bob Greenblatt said.

I don’t want this show to take Natasha Lyonne away from OITNB, because she’s wonderful there and needed there. Please let the scheduling gods be with her on this so that she can do both.

Lyonne’s droll brand of melancholy seems perfect for a story about a younger woman dealing with an opinionated bunch of wise-ass elders.

Image @Rob Kim/Getty Images North America
Image @Rob Kim/Getty Images North America

Anything Amy Poehler touches will be funny – you know that in advance. But the really important thing about this whole project to me is that I think the elders in this series will be treated with respect. I’m hoping it will be like Golden Girls or Hot in Cleveland, where elders are funny but not made fun of. For that reason alone, I’m excited about the potential of Old Soul, or whatever it ends up being called.

Amy Poehler image: Jason Merritt/WireImage

Recap: Lost Girl S4, E10 Waves

In the “Waves” episode of Lost Girl, two separate stories are told in tandem. One is a procedural crime-solving tale involving Kenzi, Dyson and Lauren. The other takes us back to the train and answers a lot of questions for us about Bo and Rainer. This being Lost Girl, the episode also sets up a lot of new questions for us to ponder as we wait for the next episode.

What have I done?
What have I done?

Bo (Anna Silk) hangs her head over the sink in the clubhouse bathroom, hearing voices in her head expressing doubt about her actions. She looks at herself in the mirror. She’s bloody. Rainer (Kyle Schmid) comes into view. Rainer says, “It had to be done,” but Bo looks skeptical.

A blonde woman (Karen Cliche) is on the phone threatening business associates. She’s by a pool, which she walks into for a swim. Something disturbs the water behind her, there are a couple of thunks in the music.

Don't go near the water
Don’t go near the water

When she pulls herself out of the pool, her legs are missing.

Lauren (Zoie Palmer) and Dyson (Kris Holden-Ried) are at the boxing ring. They complain that Bo has locked them out, has taken off for the train on her own. Kenzi (Ksenia Solo) comes in with giant coffees for everyone and a case to solve. Lauren and Dyson thinks she’s nuts talking about cases when Bo is off on the train alone, but Kenzi says, “A woman’s legs went missing.”

What about Bo?
What about Bo?

They argue about Bo, whether they should do something or trust her to go it alone.

You have to help me.
You have to help me.

In rolls the aforementioned legless lady. How are Dyson and Lauren going to ignore that?

Bo is cleaned up, sitting on her bed in a kimono, looking worried. Rainer comes in wearing a towel. Bo says, “I need to understand. What if this is a mistake?”

I want to trust you, I do.
I want to trust you, I do.

“I had to go back to the train for you. I went dark for you. I did the impossible. But this. . . .  What we did.”

Rainer says it was necessary. Bo says the memories are back, but now that they are in her world, the real world, she needs to understand. The camera moves to some candles, a train whistle sounds, and we go into an extended flashback of Bo’s time on the train. The explanation for all the blood and her concern over what they did will come later.

You kidnapped me
You kidnapped me

Bo enters the train, mad about her friends being harassed, the pub being blown up, and being kidnapped. We’re at the start of her train ride. Rainer stands beside a windup record player, spinning “The Wanderer.”

Rainer is tired of brunettes, tired of the music he’s playing and not interested in answering questions. As he sees it, her choices are stay while he pretends to court her until he’s tired of her, or she gets off at the next stop. Either way, she’ll remember nothing.

Why am I here?
Why am I here?

Bo suggests option 3. He tells her why he kidnapped her. He claims he doesn’t know why she’s there. He calls the handmaiden (Linzee Barclay) to show Bo her chambers and says she’ll be getting off at the next stop if she knows what’s good for her.

Lauren offers the legless lady a drink of water, which she refuses.

Oh, you don't want a drink
Oh, you don’t want a drink?

Dyson, Lauren and Kenzi listen to legless Diana and her tale. She claims she’s a pixie. She points a finger of suspicion at at dude named Darren in her corporation. Diana will get them into the corporation undercover. Dyson says he and Kenzi will go undercover because he’s been training her.

Kenzi says, “Shadow thief. Check your panties. Anyone missing any panties?” She waves a pair of purple panties in the air. Lauren grabs them and says, “You have got to stop doing that.” Dyson says, “I did not teach her to do that.” These three together are better than a vaudeville act.

Undercover at the corporation, Dyson was supposed to be an efficiency expert but we see him rolling a mail cart. Kenzi was supposed to be a mail girl, but she’s in an office in a red suit, looking at a computer. Not the kind of role switching these two have done before, but still pretty funny. The three investigators are connected to each other by earpieces. Lauren’s back at the boxing gym, doing science with her phone, iPad, and a water hose.

Halt right there.
Halt right there.

Dyson delivers mail to Darren’s office, but is stopped by Tad (Matt Lemche). Nobody gets to go to Darren’s office. Since he can’t deliver the mail, Dyson attaches a heat sensing band aid to the the mail. Kenzi will follow the heat trail by climbing through the vent system. Yeah, you kinda had to be there to get it.

A whole lotta legs
A whole lotta legs

Kenzi drops out of a vent into a room full of disembodied gams. Legs everywhere. She hears a noise. It’s Darren’s mail dropping into a vat. Kenzi finds a medical report for Tad that involves big money. She sends photos to Lauren.

Plant samples for our favorite doctor, coming up.
Plant samples for our favorite doctor, coming up.

Dyson is at the swimming pool where he sees a plant Lauren is interested in. He grabs some for Lauren. Dyson notices the pool is salt water and he finds a pearl.

Kenzi calls dibs on the pearl
Kenzi calls dibs on the pearl

The handmaiden enters Bo’s chambers on the train, only to be grabbed and threatened. Bo and her knife are always ready for action.

Let's have answers
Let’s have answers

The handmaiden tells Bo that the next stop isn’t for 3 days. If she jumps off before that, she’ll evaporate or get transcendental sickness and die. (Where is Clio when you need her?) Bo lets the handmaiden go. She lays out a dress in which Bo will look ravishing and gives her an invitation to dinner with Rainer. She says they all need Bo.

This isn't a pearl
This isn’t a pearl

Lauren examines the pearl. She asks, “Has Bo called, pool boy?” Nope, not yet. Lauren says the pearl is actually a crystallized salt deposit, which makes Dyson all upset. “We should never have taken this case. Kenzi, you need to get out of there!” Lauren and Kenzi ask, why, what is it? Dyson answers, “Mermaids.” Mermaids are the absolute worst!

Kenzi gets excited because of Darryl Hannah movies, but Dyson says mermaids are the psychopaths of the sea. Kenzi wants to stay and fight the mermaid.

Bo goes to dinner (in her regular ravishing leather, not in the ravishing dress the handmaiden brought). She sticks her knife in the roast and is not making friendly gestures toward Rainer. He again says he didn’t bring her there. He puts the knife to her throat and says, “You are not going to change anything.”

Are you a succubus?
Are you a succubus?

Bo steps back and her eyes go blue. Rainer’s interested in that. He smiles and wants to know what the dark fae devour these days. Bo says she’s unaligned. That’s impossible, says Rainer.

Bo says, “What kind of Fae are you? Some kind of memory wiper?”

It's in the cards
It’s in the cards

He holds up a Wanderer card. “Memory is not my power. It’s my curse.” She walks out on dinner with a to-go plate. Rainer’s plate.

Let's have a talk
The working girl wants to  have a talk

Kenzi tries her luck with Tad in her quest to save the world from mermaids. Guess what? Tad’s legless, too. He loves Darren because he saved him from something that took his legs. He leaves for a meeting. She digs through his file cabinet and finds a folder full of “creeper mail.”

Rainer plays the organ in Bo’s room. (An organ with a keyboard. You know. For music. We don’t get to the other organ until later on.)

You asked what my power was.
You asked what my power was.

Bo interrupts him and he tells her his power was foresight in battle. He could see his opponents attacks before they happened. He says he put it to good use trying to end light and dark. Wow, that gets Bo’s attention. He says he’s seen slaughters over light and dark and tyrannical rule on the rise. Bo wants to know whose rule? Nobody mentions the Blood King, but she has to be thinking it.

She’s looking at him sympathetically. I think he just reeled her in. He talks about not being able to remember why he’s there and who cursed him. She says, “It’s torture. It’s not living.”

Kenzi’s snooping around in the room full of floating legs again.

Cold as a fish, is Darren
Cold as a fish, is Darren

Darren (Brandon Firla) enters and does some magic by waving his hand at Kenzi. It makes her bork up what looks like plain water. He finally lets her stop barfing water and digs through her purse, where he sees the creeper mail. The mail is from his sister and contains pearls. Translation: she’s going to kill him.

Kenzi’s figured out Darren is a merman. Tad was his first set of donor legs. His sister Dominique took off Diana’s legs but she doesn’t know how to attach them to herself. He asks her to take him to Diana. He talks about needing legs to be part of a world he doesn’t belong in. Kenzi can grok that.

Dominique will have to be captured in water.

Lauren takes off a thick terry robe and steps in the salt water pool. Yes, Lauren in a swim suit. 10,000 photos of this moment are available on Twitter and Tumblr, so I’m skipping to the action.

Mermaid bait
Mermaid bait

Lauren wades out into the pool and waits to have her legs bitten off. Dyson lurks nearby ready to snare a big fish. There’s a disturbance in the water, Dyson says, “Now,” and Lauren pushes the button on a device in her hand.

That's one upset fish
That’s one upset fish

The device sets the fish to flopping and Lauren’s legs are saved. Thank goodness.

The train conductor announces the next stop will be in two minutes as Bo steps into a baggage car. She goes up to a glass bell jar. Inside is something that takes her all the way back to her childhood when she found a blue butterfly.

The butterfly
The butterfly memory

We see young Bo (Sadie Alter), a tear streaming down her face as she holds the butterfly. Adult Bo has a matching tear as she remembers.

The butterfly
The butterfly

Bo removes the glass covering and picks up the butterfly. Rainer says, “What did you do?”

“When I was seven . . . ” but Bo doesn’t finish the sentence because Rainer takes her hand. He says, “It is you.”

Oh, oh. We know what that look means.
Oh, oh. We know what that look means.

The butterfly flits away. Bo turns and looks at Rainer. It’s Bo’s I want you right now look, which can only mean trouble if you ask me. She says, “What’s this? Us?” He pushes her away because she’s going to miss her stop.

He turns back to the empty butterfly container and yells, looks frustrated and angry. Why? Your guess is as good as mine.

I'm back
I’m back

Bo comes back and plants a big lip lock on Rainer. She says, “What am I doing?” Then she does it again. What IS she doing? Your guess is as good as mine.

Lauren looks at the mermaid and says, “God, she’s beautiful.” Brings back happy memories, that remark.

Caught a big one
Caught a big one

Dominique the mermaid (Kate Todd) wants legs. Wants to walk. Lauren tells her it’s wrong, she’s hurting people. She says she needs legs to get to her brother, Darren. He didn’t come home like he was supposed to. She says, “Do you have any idea what it’s like to be ignored? To be locked out by someone you love?”

Lauren and Dyson both can grok that.

A tear from the mermaid’s eye forms into a pearl. She’s been sending them to Darren. That’s her 18th, which means she’s suffered enough to kill someone. But she won’t kill Darren. Her sister, on the other hand, she’d love to kill. Her sister’s a liar so that’s why she took her human walking sticks.

About the time Dyson and Lauren learn that Dominique has a sister whose legs she snatched, Kenzi touches Diana and discovers what a cold fish she is. Well, damn, she’s not a pixie. Nope, another mermaid. This mermaid thinks Kenzi is her new bottom half and brother Darren is there to help make it happen.

Darren prepares to sever Kenzi’s legs as Dyson and Lauren show up with Dominique.

Don't piss Lauren off, fish fingers.
Don’t piss Lauren off, fish fingers.

Dyson’s wolf lunge for Darren is interrupted by the mermaid magic that makes Dyson toss his last drink of water. Pisses Lauren off, it does. Lauren has the scientific presence of mind to notice that the plant from the swimming pool is dying in a beaker of tap water near the sink.

The whole family is together. Darren proposes a plan that will keep them together.

Big happy family
Big happy family

They’ll all get legs and live happily ever after. Nothing can stop them. Except tap water. Lauren gives them a huge drenching with plain old tap water. Take that, fish faces.

Time works differently in here.
Time works differently in here.

Bo and Rainer are in bed, smiling, happy, laughing about how many stops of the train Bo has missed while boinking Rainer. She says, “Are my friends still safe?”

He says, “Kenzi and Dyson are coming close to finding the compass. When they do, you won’t remember me.”

“Screw your curse,” Bo says. “Everything’s ready.”

They sit up in the bed and review Bo’s plan to come back to release Rainer from his curse. The opera singer, Hugen in a jar, and the biggest clue of all – Bo signing a contract with the dark. She asks him to witness it. She knows that she would never align herself and finding out she’s dark will lead her to find the answers, to him.

“What if I’m a monster?” he says. She answers, “Then I’ll kill you myself.”

The mark makers
The mark makers

Bo puts her hand on his chest. He puts his hand on her chest. There’s dramatic music and gasping and light coursing through Rainer’s arm.

A fast rewind through Bo waking up on the train, jumping off, running through the woods, getting her agreement to be dark from the Archivist.

We are back in the present. The Una Mens receive a surprise visit from Bo and Rainer.

That's not a friendly face, Rainer.
That’s not a friendly face, Rainer.

He tosses a Wanderer card at The Keeper (Christine Horne). She makes it disintegrate. Rainer’s Fae powers are restored when the card burns. He foresees her attack. The Keeper says he was cursed because he had too much power as a rebel. For helping him, The Keeper tells Bo they will kill the claimed human, the doctor, the wolf, the siren and everyone she loves. Then they will kill her.

The Keeper orders the Una Mens to attack.

Duck
Duck

Bo and Rainer take fighting positions back to back. He tells her when to duck, when to kick, when to block and together they battle the Una Mens.

Lauren, Kenzi and Dyson mop up all that’s left of the mermaid family after their demise by tap water. Lauren says, “We make an excellent team.” Kenzi checks her phone and says, “Bo never called. What are they even doing?”

That's how she got so bloody, eh?
That’s how she got so bloody, eh?

Well, Kenzi, to answer your question, Bo is running a sword through The Keeper. I’m pretty sure killing off the Una Mens is going to bring all sorts of trouble to our girl Bo. The Keeper mentioned right before Bo poked her real hard that if Bo followed Rainer she would suffer a fate even worse than her own whore of a mother’s.

We go back to Bo’s bedroom where we began the episode, where Bo and Rainer have washed off all the blood. Trick comes in.

Don't do what Rainer wants
Don’t do what Rainer wants

Trick warns Bo that Rainer will ask her to slay the Una Mens. He begs her not to do it. The power will be amassed into the origin seed that was stolen from him. In the wrong hands . . .

We see the origin seed as currents of power collect in it.

Whose hand is that?
Whose hand is that?

Bloody fingers reach out to take the seed. Care to guess whose fingers they are? My bet is on Aife, but we have to wait to see for sure because the episode is over.

Personal Thoughts

  • Lots of answers, but lots of new questions. Here are a few. Is Rainer evil? Is Bo under Rainer’s spell? What will the consequences of killing the Una Mens be for Bo? What was the point of the butterfly story and how does it make Rainer think he knows who Bo is?
  • I think Rainer is a monster and Bo will have to kill him. That’s her destiny.
  • They do it all the time in Lost Girl: a transient character has the same problem one of the main characters has. Kenzi meets a character who wants to fit into a world where he doesn’t belong. Lauren and Dyson meet a character who has been shut out of the life of someone she loves. Bo meets a character who says he wants to bring an end to light and dark and have the Fae act as one. They made especially heavy use of it in this episode.
  • The light on the train was amazing. Desaturated to almost black and white and much less shadowy than elsewhere. Beautiful.
  • Rainer is more disruptive than the invention of the smart phone. Everyone with a favorite couple – be it Bo and Lauren or Bo and Dyson or even Bo and Tamsin – will need couples therapy if this keeps up.
  • It was fun watching Kenzi, Lauren and Dyson go all Bob Newhart and talk to themselves in empty rooms because they were supposed to be connected by some kind of ear technology.
  • My bet’s on Aife to harness the collected power of the Una Mens in the origin seed. Rainer complained about “another brunette,” The Keeper mentioned her to Bo, the fingers reaching for the seed look female, and Aife hasn’t been heard from since episode 1 of this season. Aife and Rainer may know each other. Rainer assumed that a succubus is dark Fae. Do you have a better idea?
  • Pop culture references are everywhere in this episode. Some I didn’t mention above were references to George Michael, Working Girl, Sigourney Weaver and Alien, the game Risk, celebrities stalked in Whole Foods parking lots and more.

Watch This: Cave Digger Trailer

Cave Digger is an award-winning  documentary about an unusual artist who digs caves in the sandstone of Northern New Mexico. The caves are works of art filled with carved sculptures, furniture, rooms with arched entries and fantastic displays that range from things like flowers and leaves to abstract designs.

This extraordinary cave artist is Ra Paulette. Most of his work is on private land and not open to the public. Catching this film may be the only chance you will have to see his amazing sculptures.

The film Cave Digger is the work of Jeffrey Karoff. The documentary will show at The Guild Cinema in Albuquerque on February 17 – 19. It will be at the Sedona Film Festival on February 22 – March 2. You can learn about future screenings at cavediggerdocumentary.com.

The film has won numerous award for its exploration of Ra Paulette and his unique artistic obsession. It was nominated for an Oscar in 2014 in the documentary short subject category.

Hit the Lights, Lost Girl

Can you see K.C. Collins in the screen shot above? He’s there, down at the end of the line, next to Ksenia Solo, who is also hard to see.

Outside light
Outside light

Here’s another image with K.C. Collins that presumably involves outside light. Still hard to see, isn’t he?

Maybe it’s because of budget issues, as mehlsbells suggests, but Lost Girl is generally dark. I don’t mean only in story line, I mean in terms of actual light. Things are hidden away in shadows most of the time. Screen shots that I use from Lost Girl in my recaps have to be run though Photoshop and brightened considerably or they would look like nothing more than a dark blur on a web page.

That means that K.C. Collins is often so badly lit that you can’t even see him.

He’s in the cast, he’s an important character, he deserves to be seen. Let us see him! Light him with a spotlight or something so that he pops out of the shadows. There has to be a way.

I know filming for season 4 is finished, but I’m hoping there will be a season 5. And, in season 5, I’m hoping that K.C. Collins will be visible when he’s in a shot.

orange is the new black screen shot
Orange is the New Black screen shot

Look at the contrasting dark and light skinned faces in this shot from Orange is the New Black. Granted OITNB isn’t using darkness and shadow like Lost Girl. OITNB is in a brightly lit prison. However, every face is equally visible, no matter the skin tone.

That’s all I want. I want K.C. Collins to be equally visible in scenes he’s in.

Come on Showcase, come on Emily Andras, come on Jay Firestone – do something about the lighting on K.C. Collins.

Vimeo Tries Out a New Video On Demand Idea

Vimeo is moving into a new area of video on demand that may change the way films are released. If you are a member of Vimeo PRO ($199 a year) you can see certain films released there long before they are in wide release.

In VOD for Everyone? Vimeo’s Blake Whitman Tells Us About Opening Up Self-Distribution With Vimeo On Demand, Blake Whitman, Vimeo’s VP of Creative Development, is quoted as saying,

I think it’s a natural progression — we’ve been a platform for video creators to share and distribute their work. Distribution has different meanings for different people — and for filmmakers that means actually selling and seeing revenue for work that they’re making. Vimeo on Demand, that’s the next step of self-distribution. We make tools for individual creators — how can we help them make money for what they do? We think we’re in a great place now with the platform we’ve created and the audience that we built to really take a step into that arena and hopefully help filmmakers all over the world.

That was where Vimeo started with the VOD idea back in March. This is still true with Vimeo. Anyone can distribute a film there.

Cinemanovels poster

Vimeo has taken its business model to a new level by actively seeking films to add to its video on demand library.

An independent film I supported on Kickstarter and am interested in seeing is Cinemanovels, directed by Terry Miles and starring Lauren Lee Smith and Jennifer Beals. Recently it was announced that Cinemanovels and 9 other films from The Toronto International Film Festival will premier on Vimeo VOD.

According to Vimeo Offers TIFF World Premieres $10,000 Advance for Digital Rights, this is a boost to the indie filmmaker as well as an opportunity for the eager viewer to get in on a film before it makes it to a general release. Buying first rights to films is a new step since the announcement in March that filmmakers could put their work on Vimeo VOD.

At $199 a year, Vimeo PRO isn’t going to compete with YouTube, but it certainly can be competition for Netflix, Hulu Plus and Amazon Prime. This new business model from Vimeo really opens things up for independent filmmakers by giving them a distribution channel that didn’t exist before.

Monday Night Madness

Now that the new TV season brings back some of my favorite shows, there are so many shows on Monday night I want to see that it took me two days to watch them all. Here are some quick reactions to what I watched.

Join in with a comment if you have a different Monday night favorite.

Switched at Birth

I love this show, I love the silent moments where there is only sign language, I love the characters. The first episode of the new season was a solid one, building on where we left off last season. New students at the school will be interesting. Kathryn (Lea Thompson) is having some sort of personal crisis. Lots of new things going on while the old plot lines advance.

The Fosters

The honeymoon lasted all of one morning for newlywed moms Sherri Saum and Terri Polo. That’s when they figured out that the foster daughter they were all set to adopt (Maia Mitchell) had run away. The rest of the episode was the hunt for her and a look at how her absence affected other members of the family. Annie Potts was still hanging around post-wedding and anytime you get to see Annie Potts is a good time. This is such a good show. I hope you are watching it.

Castle

Here we are in season 6 of Castle and, WOW!, one of the best episodes ever of this show pops up. James Brolin guest starred as Castle’s father. There was just the right mix of crime solving, character, suspense, emotion, and great storytelling in this episode. It was electrifying.

Bitten

I haven’t made up my mind on this one yet. It’s a werewolf story, which is okay. No problem with the scifi stuff. I’m not crazy about the ratio of male to female characters. Too many males, not enough females. Too many characters, period. Who are all these people? I had a problem with the one leading female character (Laura Vandervoort). I’m not really attached to her yet. And if I’m not hooked in the first episode, I may not ever take the bait. I’ll try again next week and see what happens. What did you think of it?

Lost Girl

This show is a complete favorite of mine. You know that if you’ve read any of my Lost Girl recaps from season 4. This show does have a great male to female ratio and the women are not just there for decoration. Bo (Anna Silk) wasn’t around much in episode 1 of the new season, but it gave us a chance to see Ksenia Solo take a turn in the lead and do an outstanding job at it.

Intelligence

Episode 2 was even better than episode 1, in my opinion. Josh Holloway is doing a great job as Mr. Cyborg of America while remaining entirely human in his performance. Meghan Ory and Marg Helgenberger’s interactions with him are perfect. The tech is fascinating.

I know a lot of people like Sleepy Hollow and Almost Human but I can’t build up any enthusiasm for either of them. What was your Monday night schedule?

Recap: Lost Girl S4, E9 Destiny’s Child

In the Lost Girl episode “Destiny’s Child,” we learn some long-held secrets and unravel some of season 4’s mysteries – or do we?

The welder on the train
The welder on the train

On the midnight train to some other plane of existence a welder works as the train falls to bits around him. The crown inscribed Isabeau sits beside him. Does this welder have something to do with Bo’s grandmother?

Bo (Anna Silk) gathers Trick (Rick Howland), Kenzi (Ksenia Solo), Lauren (Zoie Palmer) and Dyson (Kris Holden-Reid) in the Dal. She announces she’s ready to get to the bottom of whatever is going on.

What's in the bottle, Bo?
What’s in the bottle, Bo?

Bo brings out the bottle of dark matter she mailed herself. There’s arguing about what she should do with it. Bo is unimpressed with every other point of view but her own, and she takes the lid off the jar.

Black smoke drifts out of the jar, causing Trick pain. The smoke forms into this dude.

Friend or foe?
Friend or foe?

Bo asks if he’s friend or foe.

He introduces himself as Hugin (Jonathan Watton) and says he means no harm. He’s The Wanderer’s vessel, traveling from plane to plane. Bo knows they’ve met before and he says he and his brother Munin are the ones who took her away in a puff of black smoke. The brothers took Bo to their father’s train.

“Father?” asks Bo.

He answers yes, The Wanderer is a great man. Hugin mentions that his brother is the one who trapped him in the jar the moment Bo got on the train. Something to do with his brother lusting after his wife. He will help Bo get back to the train if she will help him take revenge against his brother and his backstabbing wife. Bo’s ready to go.

Kris and Lauren want to go, too. Hugin says no.

I love you both
I love you both

Bo turns to Lauren and Dyson and says, “I love you both, but right now I need you both to watch me walk away.” She touches both of them, looks them in the eyes, says, “It’s never going to get easier, is it?”

Off she goes in a puff of smoke.

Dyson takes off for the boxing ring to get a gun from his locker.

I brought my science
I brought science

Lauren walks in behind him and says, “I was getting my science stuff.”  Her jacket’s loaded up with vials and syringes. She’s ready to go kick some crow ass. (Hugin is a crow.) He gives her a knife, just in case. He looks at her carefully and says, “You know, I’m not sure if I could either.” What? asks Lauren. Choose, he answers.

I could choose
I could choose

“I could,” Lauren answers with a grin and a shrug. He laughs. He knows who she would choose. But what is this ambivalence he’s feeling? Is he attracted to the doctor?

Trick either has a headache or he’s thinking really hard. He gets up to leave. Kenzi and Tamsin (Rachel Skarsten) come in. They want help and answers. Trick is not helpful, in fact he’s pretty rude. There are insults and raised voices.

We need answers
We need answers, Trickopedia

Trick leaves. Kenzi and Tamsin decide to search Trick’s lair for something helpful.

Hugin and Bo rematerialize in a grave yard. He cautions her not to step on the graves or she’ll be sucked into hell by the Leviathan. She wants to get what they came for and get out of there. More crows appear, shifting into human form.

I wasn't expecting that
I did not see that coming

The first is Munin (Joris Jarsky), who considers Bo a pleasant surprise. He caws a few times and more crows fly in and take human shape. They recite a counting crows nursery rhyme until they reach “7 is the devil.”

A murder of crows
A murder of crows

Bo likes the odds. Hugin’s wife appears. Marital spats sizzle between them.

All we need now is Trick's blood
All we need now is Trick’s blood

Kenzi and Lauren scour Trick’s lair and find a blank book. Kenzi says, “This is it. We have to write in this book with Trick’s blood.” She’s sure he’s hiding an inkwell of blood somewhere. Back to searching.

Trick pays a call on Dao Ming (Jadyn Wong). She’s one of those Fae with long curvy fingernails who make you tell the truth no matter what.

Are you lying to me?
Are you trying to lie to me

Trick needs answers and he wants her help to release a blocked memory. She says no. He offers to pay. She still says no. Finally he says, you hate the person who’s blocked this memory. Who might that be, she asks. “Me,” answers Trick. She finds that interesting. She will help get the truth, no matter how painful.

The murder of crows have Bo and Hugin cornered. Bo’s ready to fight, but Hugin switches sides, kisses his wife, and laughs at tricking her. Now when he refers to The Wanderer as his “father” they all laugh. Their former employer has a particular interest in Bo, but he’s not a parent to these feathered fellows.

Let's slit her throat
Let’s slit her throat

They intend to kill her – slit her throat – but wanted to have the fun of tricking her first.

Sorry to disappoint you
Sorry to disappoint you

Bo folds her arms and falls into a grave, descending straight into the Netherworld below. “I did not see that coming,” says Munin.

In the cavelike Netherworld Bo calls out to an echoing voice to show itself. It’s the Leviathan (Jennifer Dale). The Leviathan irritates Bo by calling her Princess. Bo irritates her right back by calling her Levi.

The Leviathan
The Leviathan

Levi clamps a hand on Bo’s “hand hickey” and falls to the ground. Where did you get that mark? Bo says it came from some guy on a train.

Levi’s searched for that mark for 600 years. It was supposed to be hers. She wants it. She needs it.

Bo just wants to know where the door is. Well, shucks, no one ever leaves here the Leviathan claims. Give me the mark, says Levi. Bo will fight for it. She draws a knife.

Levi wants a game of riddles. Another way to fight. Okay. Riddle on.

Bo quickly solves Levi’s first riddle with the help of some audio visuals.

Getting the truth out of Trick takes work
Getting the truth out of Trick takes work

We’re back to getting the truth out of Trick, which isn’t easy. He admits to massacres. He admits to loving himself more than Isabeau.

Tamsin finds a loose floorboard. Under it is a Japanese folding box. It’s impossible that Trick has one.

A magical box
A magical box

The box is magical. You must know how to open it. Kenzi thinks blood is hidden in it; they agree to open the box.

The riddler
The riddler

Bo comes up with a riddle: “She’s brilliant. He’s strong. Her life is little. His life is long. Both loves are pure. Both loves are true. If you were I, who would you choose?”

Levi says, “The man. He will live longer.”

“Final answer?”

“No. The woman. You love her. You wear her humanity like a shield.”

“So we’re stickin’ with the woman?”

“No, wait. The man. You crave strength.”

Bo shakes her head no. She demands to be sent back up.

The Levi wants to know if the answer was the woman. Bo says that as far as she knows there is no answer. Levi agrees to send Bo back above ground, even though she cheats at riddles, because very soon someone Bo loves will be dead. That doesn’t sound good.

Bo hides behind a grave stone as Hugin and Munin discuss the train and making lots of money from it. She steps out from hiding and tosses a crow into a grave. Then a couple more. Then another. Finally all that’s left are Hugin, Munin and Hugin’s wife: 3 for a girl.

Hugin thinks Bo’s still outnumbered.

Dyson arrives with tooth and fang
Dyson arrives with tooth and fang

Dyson appears and nabs Hugin.

Loaded for crow
Loaded for crow with the syringe of science

Lauren arrives with a syringe in each hand and nabs Munin. The wife runs. Munin didn’t see that coming.

Bo tells Heckle and Jeckle she wants to get back on that train. Now. Dyson and Lauren chime in with descriptions of the excruciating things they can do to the Fae body. Persuaded, the brothers will get her on the train if they can leave immediately after they get here there.

Dyson and Lauren want to go with Bo. She says she has to do it alone, even though they are her family.

Catch, lover.
Catch, lover

Bo blows a kiss more or less half way between where Lauren and Dyson are standing. She says, “Catch, lover,” and splits. After the smoke clears, Lauren says, “You know that kiss was for me, right?” Yeah, right is Dyson’s opinion. You have to admire Lauren’s confidence since, as far as we know, Dyson is the only one who’s been shooting off fireworks with Bo in the last few weeks.

Do you have any idea how powerful I am?
Do you have any idea how powerful I am?

Dao Ming asks Trick to tell the worst thing he’s ever done. He agonizes, then laughs and goes on the attack, saying he could write her right out of history like he did Rainer. When he mentions Rainer, the environment shakes, the wind blows. Trick says, “That’s it. I remember who The Wanderer is.  How he came to be. What he is now. . . . I created all of this, didn’t I?”

Dao Ming says even with your power, you cannot escape fate. She laughs at him because even though he can change the future, he cannot change his nature. He leaves to warn Bo.

The ritual of opening the Japanese box has moved to the stage where Kenzi and Tamsin have the box nearly demolished. Finally they find the vials of blood.

Here's blood in your eye.
Here’s blood in your eye.

There’s the blood, right in front of Kenzi’s eyes. Have we seen a close up of Ksenia Solo’s eyes in every episode? It seems like it.

They drag out the blank book.

Fingerpainting
Fingerpainting

Kenzi dribbles blood on a page and uses some of it to write BO. Nothing happens until Tamsin touches the blob of blood and picks up the book.

Oh, oh, Tam Tam
Oh, oh, Tam Tam

Tamsin can’t let go of the book. Her arms shake. The pages flip wildly. Her name appears 3 times on a blank page, written in blood.

Valyrie time
Valkyrie time

Tamsin goes skelator and says, “I must take his soul. It belongs to me.”

Tamsin’s back in a conversation she and Trick had several hundred years ago. She flashes back to it as she holds the book.

Tamsin knelt over a body and Trick, dressed in Blood King garb, stood above her. He doesn’t want her to take the soul. She says it’s a warrior’s soul and she must take it. It is written. He knows what will happen if she doesn’t take it.

Trick calls her a vulture and says she overstates her importance. She says her lives are ending. Trick thinks her soul is damned to hell.

Don't you want new life?
I want new life

He asks Tamsin if she wants new life. More than anything, she answers. If I had more time, I would cleanse my soul and wipe my sins away.

Trick will give her new life, but for payment, he must have the soul of the dead warrior at his feet. Trick wants to curse him with his blood for arrogance, for thinking he can change the laws of the King. His soul will wander in eternity. “No one will remember his name. No one will remember Rainer, the defiant.” He turns and spits on the body.

Tamsin agrees. Trick cuts his hand and seals the deal with his blood.

Kenzi finds a big hammer and knocks the book out of Tamsin’s hands. Tamsin collapses. Kenzi attempts to revive her by saying Tammy about 20 times while patting Tamsin’s face. When Tamsin finally wakes up, she says, “Whatever you do, don’t trust Trick.”

Bo’s on the train. She finds the welder. She asks if he’s Rainer.

Are you The Wanderer?
Are you The Wanderer?

He takes off his jacket and mask. Bo pulls her knife and says, “Are you The Wanderer?”

Not what I was expecting
Not what Bo was expecting

When Bo sees his face (Kyle Schmid) she almost smiles. Then she attacks. They grapple over the knife, which he knocks away.

He puts his hand on her chest, guides her hand to his chest.

The laying on of hands
The laying on of hands

They are mark to mark. Bo touches his hand on her chest and smiles.

Lauren and Dyson are pacing the floor at the Dal. Trick tells them he knows who The Wanderer is: his mortal enemy Rainer.

Bo walks in with a cheerful, “Hey, guys.” She assures them she’s okay – great – never better. She says she found out why she agreed to be dark. It was her idea actually, so she would move heaven and earth to get back on that train. To Rainer. Willingly.

Trick is looking like, what?

Bo says she needed to break Rainer’s curse and free him from the train. She apologizes for putting everyone through everything.

Trick says, “It’s him. That’s Rainer.”

Rainer comes in to stand beside Bo.

He's my destiny
He’s my destiny

Bo says, “I did all of this because he’s not my enemy. He’s definitely not my father.” Bo takes his hand, smiles. “He’s my destiny.”

Personal Thoughts

  • This destiny thing doesn’t work for me. It’s episode 9 of the season. There are 4 episodes left in season 4 and we haven’t heard anything about a renewal for season 5 (please, a renewal). They are not going to introduce a brand new character now who is Bo’s destiny – at least not her true love kind of destiny, which is what she’s implying with her smiling and touching. Therefore, I’m considering this another misdirection in a season stuffed with them.
  • The tale of Trick’s curse creating the wandering soul rings true. He has shown numerous signs of being power mad. What an interesting twist to have Trick be the source of all this mayhem around The Wanderer. And remember the crown next to Rainer on the train? What did that have to do with Trick’s curse on the wandering soul?
  • High marks to the writers for linking Tamsin to the creation of The Wanderer. In this season when she was reborn, her wings appeared. According to Massimo, that means she is again on her last life after her life renewals from the Blood King all those years ago. When she vowed back then to cleanse her soul and wipe away her sins, she didn’t do it. But in Tamsin’s current life, she is trying to atone for her sins.
  • The Blood King has some soul searching to do, too. Will he?

Review: August: Osage County

There are many films that can make you feel as if you’ve been assaulted by life, by pain, by damage and abuse, by hurt. August: Osage County is one of these. It peers into the way abuse and pain carries down, almost intact, from one generation to the next. In this particular story, the damage is inflicted by the women.

The drive to the funeral in August: Osage County
The drive to the funeral in August: Osage County

The story begins with a father’s death. Sam Shepard as the Oklahoma poet Beverly Weston dies. The family gathers. Meryl Streep plays Violet Weston, the not-exactly-grieving widow and mother to Julia Roberts, Julianne Nicholson, and Juliette Lewis.

Violet Weston has cancer of the mouth, both physically and metaphorically. She’s addicted to about 11 different prescription drugs, which she pops with malicious intensity. The drugs do not have pleasant effect on her behavior.

Julianne Nicholson as Ivy is the daughter who stayed in Oklahoma, near her parents. Julianne Nicholson’s performance in this part is quiet and nuanced and complete perfection, especially when contrasted with the overblown emotionalism of some of the other characters. Okay, not some of the other characters; Meryl Streep’s character. She seemed too big somehow, too much.

I’m sure Meryl Streep intended her to be too big and too much. The woman doesn’t make mistakes. Violet Weston was too big and too much on purpose, I’m guessing.

Eating on the porch
Eating on the porch

Julia Roberts drives in with her husband, played by Ewan McGregor, a buttoned down kind of man, and her 14 year old daughter, played by Abigail Breslin. Her marriage is breaking up. Julia Roberts is simply wonderful in this part. She’s the eldest daughter – strong and bitter and angry. She’s the wronged wife with a cheating husband. She’s the protective mother whose 14 year old daughter attracts the attentions of her sister’s smarmy fiancé, played by Dermot Mulroney. She’s a wounded lioness, just like her mother, with sharp teeth and powerful claws.

Juliette Lewis has her own coping mechanisms for dealing with her family. Get as far away as possible, pin all sorts of unrealistic hopes and wishful thinking on a man, and pretend the realities of her upbringing never happened.

Add to this menagerie of family Violet’s sister, Mattie Fae, played expertly by Margo Martindale. She’s married to Chris Cooper. Like Violet’s husband, Mattie Fae’s husband is a kind and tender man. How did these two sisters manage to find such good men to marry? They have a mother-whipped cowering mess of a son played by Benedict Cumberbatch.

Bring all these characters together for a funeral, make them stay together for several days, and all hell breaks loose.

I want to give a particular mention to Misty Upham, who plays a Native American woman hired by Beverly to cook and clean just before he goes missing. (Perhaps you remember her from Frozen River, where she had a bigger part.) Misty Upham needs to be pulled out of the Native American niche and put into other roles. She’s terrific and should be given parts that aren’t so bound by ethnicity. Hey, Jinji Kohan, how about giving her a part in Orange is the New Black where actresses are judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters?

This story is brilliant in its specificity. It’s filled with outstanding performances. Any awards that go to August: Osage County are deserved. Like a lot of movies that deal with harsh reality, it’s hard to watch at times, even though it has moments of redemption and beauty.

I recommend August: Osage County wholeheartedly. It’s not the kind of movie you want to watch more than once, but it is the kind of movie that should be watched.

Watch This: Trailer for August: Osage County

August: Osage County opens in wide distribution today. Are you going to be there? I can’t wait!