Review: So B. It

Talitha Eliana Bateman in So B. It

So B. It is based on the best selling children’s novel by Sarah Weeks. It’s a tearjerker of a tale about finding your family and your place in the world.

So B. It begins in Reno, Nevada. Thirteen years ago, an autistic woman (Jessica Collins) with an infant was outside Bernadette’s (Alfre Woodard) apartment.

Bernadette was agoraphobic. When she heard the infant crying next door for 24 solid hours, she didn’t go outside her door. Instead she took down the walls between the two apartments.

Alfre Woodard and Talitha Eliana Bateman in So B. It

Bernadette rescued and cared for both mother and infant. The mother said her name was So B. It. She called her daughter Heidi, to which Bernadette added It. Heidi It.

They had two apartments, with an open wall between them. Someone unknown paid So B. It’s bills.

Jessica Collins and Talitha Eliana Bateman in So B. It

Thirteen years later, Heidi (Talitha Eliana Bateman) found and developed an old roll of film. When she looked at the photos, she found her mother’s vocabulary of 22 words included another word: soof. This word and some clues from the photos made Heidi think she was from Liberty, NY. She had the name of a place called Hill House, too.

Heidi was lucky. She could call a coin toss in mid-air. She could win at the slots. She won a sack of money and got on the bus to go to Liberty, NY. Alone.

She rode part way on the bus with a woman carrying kittens (Cloris Leachman). When she arrived in Liberty, she learned that the Hill House she sought was a group home for autistic individuals. One of them, Elliott (Michael Arden), looked her over carefully and said, “Soof.”

With help from a nurse at the home (Jacinda Barrett) and her friendly cop of a husband (Dash Mihok), Heidi had a place to stay and a way to keep in contact with Bernadette.

John Heard and Talitha Eliana Bateman in So B. It

Thurman Hill (John Heard), who ran Hill House, finally explained to her who she was and who her family and grandparents were.

Not everything in Heidi’s life was lucky, there were some sad parts of the story, too. But at least Heidi had a better sense of who she was and who her mother was by the end of the story.

You can see this warm-hearted story on Hulu, YouTube and several other streamers. It’s rated PG-13 but I think tweens would adore this story of the intrepid Heidi and her quest for a family history.

Poster art

Take a look at the trailer.

Have you see this film? What did you think of it?

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Author: Virginia DeBolt

After many years as an educator and writer, Virginia finally retired from working life. She's always loved a good movie or TV show and wants to use her free time to talk about them with you now. She's Old Ain't Dead!

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