Reviews of movies and TV focused on women

The Imperfects, just make us normal again, please

The Imperfects, just make us normal again, please

The Imperfects is about people who were experimental genetics subjects. They have special abilities as a result. They band together to find the scientist who changed them so they can make him change them back.

The Imperfects has 10 episodes in its first season, which allows plenty of time for many characters and subplots. The three main characters are Abbi (Rhianna Jagpal), Tilda (Morgan Taylor Campbell), and Juan (Iñaki Godoy). Several years ago they were all in a medical study. The pills they’ve been taking since then to keep their “abilities” in check have run out and no more are available.

Without the pills, they realize what was suppressed before. Abbi is a succubus – her scent makes everyone bow to her every desire. Tilda has super hearing, which is hard on her because she sings in a rock band. Juan shape shifts into a bloodthirsty chupacabra.

When the three meet up again, they’ve all gone back to the old clinic where they were originally treated. They’re looking for pills and for Dr. Alex Sarkov (Rhys Nicholson), but he’s no longer there.

The Imperfects poster featureing Italia Ricci as a scientist

Dr. Sydney Burke (Italia Ricci) is there. In fact, she’s the only one there. She uses the place as a laboratory to continue to study what she and Dr. Sarkov created years ago. She tells the three imperfects that no more pills are coming.

Dr. Burke is willing to help them, but she needs Dr. Sarkov to complete the research to reverse what’s been done. The overall arc of the season is then clear: find Sarkov and get him to help make the three main characters normal again.

None of that moves in a straight line. There are complications and twists. Just when it looks like a solution might be close, something else happens. This pattern repeats for much of the season, which made it feel longer than it needed to be. The scientific jargon thrown about by the scientists makes little sense, but recognizable words like DNA and genetics are used to make it all sound plausibly science-like

The series is rated TV-MA, mostly for language and bloody gore. There’s a tiny bit of kissing between Tilda and her bandmate boyfriend P.J. (Jedidiah Goodacre). There’s a hint of romance between Tilda and Juan. There’s a hinted at relationship between Abbi and another former test subject who now runs a coffee shop, Hannah (Celina Martin).

Every episode had its own moments and subplots. An organization named Flux was after them. Various friends and family needed attention. But mainly it was a hunt for Sarkov.

Rhys Nicholson as Sarkov was a delight. He was the bad guy, but he was actually a diva with his strong Australian accent, his red hair, and his complete lack of moral principles.

The acting talent from this cast is really strong. They are dealing with some pretty far-out story lines, but they make it real and honest sounding. If this series gets another season, the cast deserves the credit for delivering the goods.

The special effects often happened off camera. There was plenty of shape shifting – not only Juan, but another character I’m not going to spoil for you is a shape shifter, too. Mostly that took place when the camera wasn’t looking. The sets looked good, but the special effects were pretty low budget.

In last few minutes of episode 10, a whole new set of problems are introduced that set the scene for a potential second season.

This Netflix series is an original story, not an adaptation. Kim Garland lead the team of writers. Four of the episodes were directed by women: Nimisha Mukerji and Jovanka Vuckovi.


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