Watch This: Trailer for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri looks so good. So good. It stars Frances McDormand in a part that if it wasn’t written for her, it should have been. It promises to be wonderful, if the trailer can be believed. Continue reading “Watch This: Trailer for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Review: Laggies

Laggies tells the tale of Megan (Keira Knightley), who cannot grow up. She’s stuck in a high school mentality even though she has advanced degrees and has been out of high school for 10 years. She’s had the same boyfriend, Anthony (Mark Webber), since high school. Despite her college education, she’s working for her dad, standing on the sidewalk holding a sign advertising his tax business. She doesn’t have a clue about what she wants to do with her life.

Spoilers ahead. Continue reading “Review: Laggies”

The Way, Way Back is Way, Way Good

The Way, Way Back opens on the miserable face of Liam James as 14-year-old Duncan, sitting in the way, way back seat of a vintage woodie Buick station wagon. Driving this aging monster is Trent (Steve Corell), his mom’s boyfriend. His mom is Pam, (Toni Collette) and his possible future step-sister filling the middle seat with all her teen-age horribleness is Steph (Zoe Levin). They are on their way to Trent’s beach house to spend the summer.

way way back poster

Rounding out the star-studded cast we have Allison Janney, AnnaSophia Robb (remember how wonderful she was in Bridge to Terabithia? She’s even better now.), Sam Rockwell, Maya Rudolph, Rob Corddry, and Amanda Peet. It speaks to the quality of the writing and the story that so many accomplished actors were willing to take part in this production.

The trailer shows them in action.

The story revolves around Duncan. This teen has issues. His parents are recently divorced. His mom’s new boyfriend is an asshole. His dad has a new younger girlfriend and “now isn’t a good time to visit.” He doesn’t know how to talk to people. His mom is bending herself into someone else to fit into the new boyfriend’s life. He has to go everywhere on a pink girl’s bike which is as dated as Trent’s Buick.

When they arrive in the beach town, Duncan is befriended by Owen, the manager of a water park (Sam Rockwell), who teaches him how to laugh, how to assert himself, and how to take chances. As improbable a plot point as it is to imagine a grown man befriending young Duncan for purely selfless reasons, there’s a scene to somewhat explain how they connect. When the Buick pulls into town, with Duncan staring morosely out the back window, they stop in traffic. The car behind them is driven by Owen, who makes eye contact with Duncan and they share a moment while waiting for the traffic to move.

Duncan manages to find his way while all around him the significant adults in his life are drinking themselves silly, smoking pot, and damaging their own children in countless ways. Young River Alexander as Peter pronounces his mom the worst parent, but there are several candidates for that prize in this tale.

With such a stellar cast, even the smallest of characters in this busy relationship drama turn in full-blown performances. There’s a romance of sorts between Sam Rockwell and Maya Rudolph’s characters. There’s cheating going on – I won’t spoil it by telling you who – and there’s a first kiss for Duncan before it’s over.

Duncan’s awakening spurs his mom to gather up her strength, too. The movie closes on a heartwarming note.

Heartwarming is probably the best description of The Way, Way Back. There are real people with real life problems and a hopeful ending. A perfectly heartwarming movie.

Have you see it? Did you enjoy it as much as I did?